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Still from "Twa Wonan Ase" (Youtube)

Watch NiiQuaye's New Video For the Retro Highlife 'Twa Wonan Ase'

A beautiful and cinematic new video for his single featuring Kirani Ayat and Akan.

NiiQuaye's latest single "Twa Wonan Ase" is an uplifting highlife-fusion track that sees the Accra-based artist and member of the Musical Lunatics connecting with buzzing Ghanaians Kirani Ayat and Akan.

While the track itself is upbeat it carries a deeper message about the discrimination that the three Ghanaian artists face from police due to their looks and, in particular, their dreadlocks.

"I wanted to bring back an old dance band highlife sound, with guitar, in a modern way," NiiQuaye tells OkayAfrica, "so you can hear 808 in the song, giving it a modern vibe."

"I also wanted to talk about social issues through music, one of them is how police in Ghana treat people with dreads, rastas," he continues. "So I wanted someone who had been through this, all of us, Ayat, Akan, myself and Twisted [Wxves] (one of Akan and Ayat's main producers), but we wanted to talk about it in a fun way."

"if you have dreads in Ghana, you are guilty until proven innocent!," tells us Kirani Ayat. Akan adds, "I wanted to encourage people to stay focused, don't get distracted by the obstacles."

The single's beautiful new music video is a cinematic affair that sees the three acts riding vintage cars along the coast and eventually landing at a club.

Watch the new video for "Twa Wonan Ase" below and stream the single now on iTunes/Apple Music and Spotify.


NiiQuaye - Twa Wonan Ase (Official Video) ft Kirani Ayat x Akan youtu.be

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