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South African Actress Nomzamo Mbatha has Joined the 'Coming 2 America' Cast

She joins Tracy Morgan, Wesley Snipes, Leslie Jones, Kiki Layne and several others in the sequel to the 1988 comedy.

South African actress Nomzamo Mbatha, along with American actress Garcelle Beauvais, are the latest additions to the Coming 2 America cast. The sequel to the popular 1988 comedy film, will star its original leads Eddie Murphy and Arsenio Hall, and will be directed by Craig Brewer, Deadline reports. According to The Hollywood Reporter, production of the film is underway and shooting is set to begin next week.


Mbatha will reportedly take on one of the lead roles, although it is not clear at this point which one that will be. A few months ago, the actress moved to Los Angeles and left many South Africans wondering what she had developing in the pipeline that necessitated the move abroad.

TimesLIVE reports that Mbatha released a statement saying, "To God be the glory. It is truly unreal to me. The sacrifices have paid off. The goal was never insurmountable, but rather a path of commitment, diligent work and sacrifices by me and my team". The actress added that, "Moving to Los Angeles was a choice of faith, and God has surpassed my wildest dreams. This moment is bigger than me—this moment is for every single girl who doubts herself or just how big her God is. My life is a testament to that. My life says God is bigger than ginormous! I am grateful, I am humbled, I am honored to be cast in Coming 2 America."

While the likes of James Earl Jones, John Amos and Shari Headley will be returning to reprise their original roles, new members of the international cast include Tracy Morgan, Wesley Snipes, Leslie Jones, Kiki Layne, Rotimi, Teyana Taylor and several others. Coming 2 America is slated to be released in December 2020.

Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

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How Nigerian Streetwear Brand, Daltimore, is Rising To Celebrity Status

We spoke with founder and creative director David Omigie about expression through clothing and that #BBNaija pic.