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A screen grab of the "oh my god wow" guy from the Ghanaian film "Azonto Ghost" which is now a popular meme.

This Is Where the 'Oh My God, Wow' Meme Comes From

The viral meme is from a scene in the 2012 Ghanaian film, "Azonto Ghost."

In keeping up with the rise of African movies being utilized as viral memes on social media, we had to look into the origin of latest one that's graced your timelines for at least the past week.

Check out a few hilarious memes below.


This clip is part of a scene in the 2012 Ghanaian film, Azonto Ghost, starring Lil Wayne (not the rapper), Bill Asamoah and Benedicta Gafah. This film, produced by AA Productions, also was a catalyst for hiplife artist Bisa Kdeihis theme song with the same name as the movie earned him 'Best Original Song' at the Ghana Movie Awards that year.

Azonto Ghost is spoken in Twi, one of Ghana's major languages, and thanks to director, producer and screenwriter Scilla Owusu, she was able to summarize and give context as to why the man's so excited—and it's a simpler reason than we thought.

"The woman is pregnant but she was too shy to tell her husband. The husband finally convinces her to tell him what news she was hiding from him," Owusu says. "She then lets him know she's 3 months pregnant. He's so happy and gives thanks to the Lord and is very relieved to hear the great news."

It's definitely interesting to see how films like these are used in a fresh way online. Regardless of how we engage with the content via watching the film or meme generation, we still end up with uncontrollable laughs.

For our Twi speakers, check out Azonto Ghost in full on Youtube.

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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