News Brief

Okayafrica CEO Selected to Attend the First White House Festival of Ideas, Art and Action

Okayafrica's CEO, Abiola Oke, will join President Barack Obama and other young leaders at the White House to discuss building a more tolerant America

President Barack Obama is set to host the first South by South Lawn—a White House festival of ideas, art and action—in October, and Okayafrica's CEO, Abiola Oke, was selected out of thousands of nominations to attend.


He will be joining other movers and shakers to take on Obama's challenge to build towards an America that is more tolerant, fair and full of opportunities.

On October 3, South by South Lawn will be comprised of three parts:

  1. Interactive: Panel discussions throughout the day will explore topics like how to make change stick with organizers who are having an impact, as well as a discussion with influencers who are using their platforms to bring about positive change. Interactive booths will encourage attendees to engage with and learn about new technologies and innovations.
  2. Film: The film portion features the 3rd Annual White House Student Film Festival in association with its founding partner, the American Film Institute. Students in grades K-12 submitted more than 700 short films round this year's theme, The World I Want to Live In. The submissions are inspiring and we're excited to share official selections and honor young filmmakers as part of this event.
  3. Music: Musical performances will include well-known and emerging artists who are using their music to inspire audiences.

Congratulations to Abiola and all the nominees that have been selected to attend!

Abiola Oke, Okayafrica CEO

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