#Okay100Women

OkayAfrica's 100 Women 2017

OkayAfrica's 100 Women celebrates African women who are making waves, shattering ceilings, and uplifting their communities.

This year, OkayAfrica selected 12 themes for each month to cover in 2017. In conjunction with our theme, "Black Girls Only," during Women's History Month (March), we are celebrating black women who are making waves, shattering ceilings, and uplifting their communities. For the first time this year (and hopefully every year hereafter) we honor a selection of them as OkayAfrica's 100 Women.


We feel it's our duty to share at least 100 dope women who hail from the continent and the diaspora with you. Since we have the amazing privilege of calling brilliant African women our family, friends, mentors, idols and seestahs—it's only right to present this amazing collective of Champions, Visionaries, Innovators, Pioneers and Creators.

Compiling this list was no easy feat. We took into consideration recommendations from our ever-growing network and nominations from our audience to bring you a combination of bonafide leaders and up-and-comers who are game-changers in their respective fields.

Representation by country and social impact were also key factors, including how well these women use their resources to help other women. All of these individuals are beacons in their communities. All of these ladies are fearless, unapologetic and driven.

We gathered as African women who worked tirelessly on this list. After months of researching, learning, intense debating and listening, our hope is that you feel as empowered by and proud of the women profiled here as we do.

OkayAfrica's 100 Women is for us, by us—and this is just the beginning.

Style & Beauty

VELMA "ROSSA" MAKHANDIA

LOZA MALÉOMBHO

KAHINDO MATEENE

GRACE MAHARY

PHILOMENA KWAO

FLAVIANA MATATA

IMAN ABDULMAJID

MARIA BORGES

JACKIE AINA

AMAKA OSAKWE

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Watch Focalistic & Vigro Deep’s New Music Video For ‘Ke Star’

The 'Lockdown Level 1 anthem' has come to life through fire visuals.