#Okay100Women

OkayAfrica's 100 Women 2017

OkayAfrica's 100 Women celebrates African women who are making waves, shattering ceilings, and uplifting their communities.

This year, OkayAfrica selected 12 themes for each month to cover in 2017. In conjunction with our theme, "Black Girls Only," during Women's History Month (March), we are celebrating black women who are making waves, shattering ceilings, and uplifting their communities. For the first time this year (and hopefully every year hereafter) we honor a selection of them as OkayAfrica's 100 Women.


We feel it's our duty to share at least 100 dope women who hail from the continent and the diaspora with you. Since we have the amazing privilege of calling brilliant African women our family, friends, mentors, idols and seestahs—it's only right to present this amazing collective of Champions, Visionaries, Innovators, Pioneers and Creators.

Compiling this list was no easy feat. We took into consideration recommendations from our ever-growing network and nominations from our audience to bring you a combination of bonafide leaders and up-and-comers who are game-changers in their respective fields.

Representation by country and social impact were also key factors, including how well these women use their resources to help other women. All of these individuals are beacons in their communities. All of these ladies are fearless, unapologetic and driven.

We gathered as African women who worked tirelessly on this list. After months of researching, learning, intense debating and listening, our hope is that you feel as empowered by and proud of the women profiled here as we do.

OkayAfrica's 100 Women is for us, by us—and this is just the beginning.

Style & Beauty

VELMA "ROSSA" MAKHANDIA

LOZA MALÉOMBHO

KAHINDO MATEENE

GRACE MAHARY

PHILOMENA KWAO

FLAVIANA MATATA

IMAN ABDULMAJID

MARIA BORGES

JACKIE AINA

AMAKA OSAKWE

Interview
Photo: Mariela Alvarez.

Interview: ÌFÉ Blends Music & Religion to Honor Those Who Have Died During the Pandemic

Producer and percussionist Otura Mun talks about his latest EP, The Living Dead, and how he traces the influences of West Africa in his new work.

There are bands that open up a spiritual world through their music. ÌFÉ is one example. An electro-futurist band that fuses Afro-Cuban rhythms and Jamaican dancehall with Yoruba mystical voices. With the success of their 2017 debut album "IIII+IIII" (pronounced Eji-Ogbe), ÌFÉ has reached an audience that is looking for Caribbean and contemporary sounds.

The Puerto Rican-based band just released a new EP, The Living Dead- Ashé Bogbo Egun, that aims to heal and honor those who have died during this pandemic. Otura Mun, the band leader, is an African-American producer and percussionist, who began a personal journey about a decade ago, when he landed in San Juan, and decided to move there. He learned Spanish, dug deep into his African ancestry and started to practice the Yoruba-Caribbean religion of Santería.

ÌFÉ, which means "love and expansion" in Yoruba, ties two worlds, music and religion, artistically. This new EP modernized prayer songs to hopefully make them more accessible to a younger generation. OkayAfrica spoke with Otura Mun on his latest work.

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