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Sibot & Okmalumkoolkat Explore Zulu Ancestry And The Cosmos In Their 'Nice Shandees' Video

Watch Cape Town beatsmith Sibot and Okmalumkoolkat's futuristic visuals for "Nice Shandees," directed by Lebogang Rasethaba.


Seasoned Cape Town beatmaker Sibot and SA wordsmith Okmalumkoolkat team up in the futuristic visuals for "Nice Shandees," a booming joint off Sibot's Arc Eyes EP. The music video, directed by Lebogang Rasethaba (who co-directed Future Sound of Mzansi with Spoek Mathambo), is a blue-tinted trip that features Okmalumkoolkat rapping from a modern throne surrounded by a dance crew clad in Sibot's eye-ball gear.

"I think shandees is Durban lingo for 'things' 'stuff;'" Rasethaba writes in an e-mail to Okayafrica. "I have heard everything from cars, to girls to a burger and sometimes even cellphones described as a shandees. The idea was to create a world that has never been before, and its probably one of the most things to do now more than ever before. We used the idea of a “future mfana” as the kind of bottom line of the idea, and explored different themes around the cosmos, orbit paths, Zulu ancestry. We wanted to marry things that have never been seen together before, especially within the music video language, we just wanted to make something that stood out. And now people have a visual reference for that type of sound. I think we did ok here."

Watch the music video for Sibot and Okmalumkoolkat's "Nice Shandees" below. For more, check out Okmalumkoolkat's recent features on the Boom Africa EP, as well as his collaboration with Major League DjzCassper Nyovest, Carpo and Riky Rick in "Slyza Tsotsi."

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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