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Photo still from 'Sew the Winter to my Skin' by Elsa Bleda, courtesy of WOLF PR.

These 9 African Directors Have Submitted Their Films Into the Foreign Language Oscar Race

Malawi's Shemu Joyah and Niger's Rahmatou Keïta are first-time Oscar hopefuls.

The Academy has released the official list of submissions for the 2019 Oscar for the Best Foreign Language Film category, IndieWire reports.

Eighty-seven countries are being considered for the prize, where nine entries are coming from African directors. The official nominations are due to be announced on Tuesday, January 22, 2019, with the 91st Oscar award ceremony to hold on February 24, 2019.

In the meantime, take a look at the trailers of the Oscar contenders below.


Until the End of Time directed by Yasmine Chouikh | Algeria

Yomeddine directed by A.B. Shawky | Egypt

Supa Modo directed by Likarion Wainaina | Kenya

The Road To Sunrise directed by Shemu Joyah | Malawi

Burnout directed by Nour-Eddine Lakhmari | Morocco

The Wedding Ring directed by Rahmatou Keïta | Niger

Sew the Winter to My Skin directed by Jahmil X.T. Qubeka | South Africa

Beauty and the Dogs directed by Kaouther Ben Hania | Tunisia

I Am Not a Witch directed by Rungano Nyoni | UK (Zambia)

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Image courtesy of Chude Jideonwo

Nigerian Mental Health Advocate Chude Jideonwo Shares Practical Ways Of Coping During COVID

We speak with the founder of Joy Inc. about the mental health challenges facing Nigerians, how many have managed to find effective ways to cope, and the online resources available to the community.

Never in our lifetimes have we experienced a pandemic of this gravity. As COVID-19 cases rise in Nigeria, Nigerians aren't just worried about getting the virus, they are also concerned about a host of other challenges: our lack of efficient and effective healthcare—which is overwhelmed even without a pandemic—the lack of appropriate data, and the high levels of poverty and illiteracy in the country that make it difficult to enforce the strategies that will enable us to handle the pandemic and keep it under control.

In a bid to understand how Nigerians are dealing with mental health challenges now, on the ground, due to the pandemic—which has led to a lockdown restricting movement and also social distancing rules—we spoke with Nigerian journalist, lawyer and mental healthcare advocate Chude Jideonwo, who is the founder of Joy Inc. He shared insights from his experiences with The Joy Inc., which he founded in 2016 to help young people going through mental and emotional challenges. He aimed to help provide young Nigerians with tools to help navigate the world around them.

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'This Is One Too Many'—African Union Condemns the Murder of George Floyd

"The African Union is distressed to witness yet another unwarranted execution of another African-American male."