Popular
Photo by JP Yim/Getty Images.

Ozwald Boateng's Fashion Show at the Apollo Was an Exploration of Authentic Identity

The Ghanaian-British designer presented a new collection inspired by his African roots and the Harlem Renaissance.

Ozwald Boateng, the Ghanaian-British fashion designer known for his meticulous bespoke suits, recently held a fashion show at the iconic Apollo Theater in partnership with social networking platform, Vero.

When he made the announcement of the show, the designer floated around the abbrevation "AI" which we all know as "artificial intelligence," but this time, however, it was intended to stand for "authentic identity," CNN reports.

The models casted were a diverse multigenerational array of who's who in fashion, music and in Black Hollywood including Michael K. Williams, Jidenna, Adesuwa Aighewi, Aldis Hodge, Jo-Ani Johnson and more. They donned Boateng's classic three-piece suits as well as silk ensembles with wax print-inspired ensembles, Ethiopian-inspired jewlery across hues of greens, blues, earth-tones, grey and white.

"We live in a time where Authentic Identity is becoming a crucial part of who we are and the journey we are on," Boateng says to CNN.

Take a look at a few of our favorite looks below.


Photo by JP Yim/Getty Images.

Photo by JP Yim/Getty Images.

Photo by JP Yim/Getty Images.

Photo by JP Yim/Getty Images.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.