Events

An Evening With Philip Glass and Gambian Kora Master Foday Musa Suso

Internationally renowned composer Philip Glass and master kora player Foday Musa Suso's dramatic and style-shifting NYC concert.

Internationally renowned composer Philip Glass and master kora player Foday Musa Suso have been performing and collaborating for the better part of the last three decades.


Their most recent appearance, which was hosted at Brooklyn’s newly opened performance arts space National Sawdust and co-produced by the World Music Institute, included percussionist Asher Delerme and cellist Jeffrey Zeigler for a four-piece ensemble.

Their 90-minute set included selections from Glass and Suso’s famous collaborative album, The Screens. Originally commissioned as accompaniment for a play by Jean Genet about Algeria’s independence from France, this unconventional pairing was inspired by the playwright’s desire to contain both African and European traditions.

As with each revisitation of the duo’s 1992 LP, Glass and Suso updated the original composition of tracks like “The Mad Caidi’s Court,” “Night On The Balcony” and “The Orchard,” accommodating for their lack of players with a tightly arranged rework. A similar approach was taken from songs performed from their score work on Godfrey Reggio’s 1988 art house documentary, Powaqqatsi.

The evening reached its peak during the ensemble’s performance of Philip Glass’ Orion, a remarkable album featuring an international cast of collaborators (including Ravi Shankar, Wu Man, Ashley MacIsaac and Suso).

Between ensemble arrangements were a few captivating, wholly arresting solo sets. The first was from Jeffrey Zeigler performing Philip Glass’ solo cello composition, “Orbit.” Later in the set, Foday Musa Suso shared two original songs (“Kenyalon,” “Cloud Walk”) from his catalogue of solo material.

These songs featured a dramatic shift in the style which Suso performed the kora, a massive, 21-string harp-like instrument invented by his ancestral grandfather almost four centuries ago. Tuned in a customary West African mode, these exciting solo kora songs were more intense and much less inhibited than formal arrangements by the full ensemble.

Philip Glass and Foday Musa Soso closed the night with a stunning reprise of their opening number, “The Mad Caidi’s Court.”

Philip Glass, Foday Musa Suso, Asher Delerme and Jeffrey Zeigler. Photography by Jill Steinberg,

Set List

1. “The Mad Caidi’s Court”

2. “Shadow Dance”

3. “Rosegarden”

4. “Night On The Balcony”

5. “Orion”

6. “Orbit”

7. “Spring Waterfall”

8. “The Orchard”

9. “Kenyalon”

10. “Cloud Walk”

11. “Voices Of Octaves”

12. “The Mad Caidi’s Court (reprise)”

Music
Image: Nabsolute Media

Reekado Banks Recalls The Carnage of The #EndSARS Protests In Single 'Ozumba Mbadiwe'

The Nigerian singer pays his respects to those lost during last year's #EndSARS protests.

Nigerian singer and songwriter Reekado Banks is back with a track that is as socially important as it is a banger. It seems fitting for the singer's first solo release of the year to be a tribute to his fellow countrypeople fighting for a country that they all wish to live in. The 27-year-old Afrobeats crooner has returned with endearing track 'Ozumba Mbadiwe', honoring the one-year anniversary of the #EndSARS protests that saw the Nigerian government authorize an onslaught of attacks on Nigerian citizens for their anti-government demonstrations.

The protests took the world by storm, additionally because the Nigerian government insists that none of the police brutality happened. In an attempt to gaslight the globe, Nigerian officials have come out to hoards to deny any and all accusations of unlawfully killing peaceful protesters. Banks mentions the absurd denials in the track, singing "October 20, 2020 something happened with the government, they think say we forget," in the second verse. Reekado's reflective lyrics blend smoothly and are supported by the upbeat, effortless Afrobeat rhythm.

In another reflective shoutout to his home, 'Ozumba Mbadiwe' is named after a popular expressway on Lagos Island that leads to the infamous Lekki Toll Gate where protesters were shot at, traumatized, and murdered. Although packed with conscious references, the P.Priime produced track is a perfect amalgamation of the talents that Reekado Banks has to offer; a wispy opening verse, a hook to kill, and an ethereal aura to mark this as a song as a hit. On "Ozumba Mbadiwe," all the elements align for Reekado's signature unsinkable sound to take flight.

Check out Reekado Bank's lyric video for his single 'Ozumba Mbadiwe'

Reekado Banks - Ozumba Mbadiwe (Lyric Video) www.youtube.com

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