Photos

In Photos: Afro-Latino Fest NYC Brings Bulla, Love and Healing to Brooklyn

Check out Okayafrica's photo round up and recap of the fun that was at Afro-Latino Fest NYC in Brooklyn's Restoration Plaza.

The past three days of festivities brought to you by the Afro-Latino Festival of New York was just the right dose of love and healing in the wake of the many occurring and recent incidents of police brutality across the U.S. The constant sight of black suffering is beyond daunting, and these days of celebrating black lives and life itself came just at the right time.


In its fourth year, the festival successfully put the contributions that people of African descent from Latin America and the Caribbean have made to NYC and the world on the map. The festival’s Afro-Panamanian organizers (and couple), Mai-elka Prado and Amilcar Priestley, sought to also provide a safe space and a networking opportunity to ultimately pay tribute to those with African roots from Latin America and the Caribbean.

Friday’s program, the AfrolatinTalks Symposium, featured panels on transnational migration, immigration, human rights, BlackLatinx Feminism, the #BlackLivesMatter movement, Representation and Cultural Heritage to Afro-Colombian Participation in the Colombia Peace Process. Attendees also enjoyed the NYC debut of “Nana Dijo; Irresolute Radiography of Black Consciousness,” directed by Bocafloja and Cambiowashere.

The turnup was real Saturday and Sunday, hosted by DJ Big Nito and Geko Jones of Que Bajo?!, despite the clouds (and rain) that loomed over Bed-Stuy’s Restoration Plaza. The music and dance with obvious ties to the continent from the likes of Bulla en el Barrio, a New York-based Afro-Colombian collective that does all things Bullerengue and Madame Vacile, who pumped out the yellow-blue-and red’s champeta vibes through the speakers. Honduran Aurelio Martinez showed out with his Garifuna tunes and moves backed by his amazing band.

Panama’s own and the headliners of day three on Sunday—Los Rakas—were excited to represent and be a part of a learning opportunity for many.

For Raka Dun and Raka Rich, the need for a strong connection across the African diaspora is imperative, especially when people don’t think of the Caribbean and Latin America as a piece of that puzzle.

“A lot of people don’t know that,” Raka Dun tells me. “So events like this are important to educate people, because this is something that they don’t teach you in schools.”

“We’re just connecting the dots and putting it all together,” Raka Rich adds. “And maybe 20 years from now it’s not going to be so taboo.”

The photos below show more of the weekend’s fun—and you’ll see familiar faces including Rich Medina, Nina Sky, Maluca, Oshun, Sango, and more. Many thanks to Mario Ruben Carrion and Ailyn Robles for New Visual Collective for their photo contributions.

Photo by Mario Ruben Carrion for New Visual Collective.

Photo by Mario Ruben Carrion for New Visual Collective.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Mario Ruben Carrion for New Visual Collective.

Photo by Ailyn Robles for New Visual Collective.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Ailyn Robles for New Visual Collective.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Photo by Antoinette Isama.

Film
Photo by Karwai Tang/WireImage via Getty.

Michaela Coel Joins the 'Black Panther' Sequel Cast

The upcoming film, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, is shaping up.

The sequel to the Oscar-winning Black Panther is only due to debut in July of 2022, but the production is well on its way.

The latest news out of the camp is that Michaela Coel, of I May Destroy You and Chewing Gum fame, has officially joined the cast of Black Panther: Wakanda Forever. Her character details are still under wraps but according to Variety, Coel has already joined director Ryan Coogler at Atlanta's Pinewood Studios, where production started in late June.

Coel joins original cast members Danai Gurira, Letitia Wright, Daniel Kaluuya, Winston Duke, Lupita Nyong'o, Florence Kasumba, and Angela Bassett all reprising their roles. Following the tragic passing of Chadwick Boseman, Marvel reportedly chose not to recast the role of T'Challa.

Read: How Michaela Coel's 'I May Destroy You' Makes Space For Black Creators

"It's clearly very emotional without Chad," Marvel Studios chief Kevin Feige mentions. "But everyone is also very excited to bring the world of Wakanda back to the public and back to the fans. We're going to do it in a way that would make Chad proud."

Michaela Coel's highly-lauded 2020 series I May Destroy You — which she wrote, directed, produced and stared in — received four Emmy nominations.

Black Panther: Wakanda Forever is scheduled for wide release on July 8, 2022.

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