Photos

Photos: 'After the Barbarians' Anton Kannemeyer


OKA took a field trip to NYC's Jack Shainman Gallery to check out Anton Kannemeyer's "After the Barbarians" exhibit. As we mentioned before, the name of the exhibit is a play on the famous novel by J.M. Coetzee called Waiting for the Barbarians. Kannemeyer's work  manages to exacerbate uncomfortable and often unspoken feelings about race, gender, and class while still making them accessible for digestion. Fellow artist, Danie Marais, writes of Kannemeyer's art that it's no wonder it "makes viewers uncomfortable about definitions of black and white, European and African," adding:

He paints post-colonial Africans as the hell-bent illegitimate children of violent historical rape, both victims and perpetrators. He implicitly asks how the clear-cut categories and neat names expressed by political correctness could accurately describe the violent mess that has spawned the likes of Apartheid, Idi Amin, and the genocide in Rwanda. On the other side, he confronts the affluent South African suburbia where Western luxuries are lined with apocalyptic fear and xenophobia.

Take a look at some of the works in the exhibit in the slide show below. The giant wall-sized paintings of Die Antwoord's Yo-Landi Vi$$er and Ninja are easily our favorites.

Style
Photo: Aisha Asamany

How Relocating to Ghana Helped Reinvigorate Jewelry Designer Aisha Asamany's Work

Moving to Ghana gave Aisha Asamany's luxury jewelry brand, inspired by Adinkra symbols that traditionally project strength, fearlessness, love and power, renewed verve to tell personal stories of her growing clientele.

In 2019, the government of Ghana made a global splash with its Year of Return initiative – the campaign sought to encourage the African diaspora to return home to the continent, specifically to Ghana.

Linked to the 400th year commemoration of the first recorded landing of slaves in the United States, it became a launchpad for the Ghanaian government to convince Black people around the world to permanently settle in the West African country.

Aisha Asamany, a corporate management consultant for high-profile UK financial institutions turned self-taught luxury jewelry designer was one of many who heeded the call, trading in the corporate life for a spiritual and an entrepreneurial journey – one of joy, appreciation, and representation in her fatherland.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Wizkid, Tems, Black Coffee & More Nominated For 2022 Grammy Awards

See the full list of African artists honored during Tuesday's nomination ceremony.