News Brief

15-Year-Old Jordan Edwards, Shot and Killed By Police In Dallas

Jordan Edwards was shot and killed by police officers in Dallas, Texas on Saturday.

15-year-old Texas teen, Jordan Edwards, was shot and killed by police in Dallas last Saturday.


Edwards was shot in the head with a rifle, after leaving a party with friends in the nearby suburb of Balch Springs. According to a police report, officers responded to a 911 call reporting "several underage kids drunk walking around the block."

The officers claim to have heard gunshots upon arriving at the scene. They then reported "an unknown altercation with a vehicle backing down the street in an aggressive manner." One of the officers then fired into the passenger seat window, fatally shooting Edwards.

On Monday, the medical examiner’s office ruled Edwards' death a homicide. The unnamed officer who killed Edwards, has been placed on administrative duty, reports the Washington Post. The Dallas County Sheriff's Department and Dallas County District Attorney's office are both launching investigation into the incident.

The Edward's family attorney, Lee Merritt, claims that the teens were not drinking. Challenging the officer's claims that their vehicle was backing up aggressively, Merritt told the Washington Post that the teens were simply backing out of a parking space when officers shot at the car.

His retelling of the incident is strikingly different from that of the police.

From the Washington Post:

Merritt said Jordan, his 16-year-old brother and three other teen boys were at a party on Baron Drive when they learned that police were on the way.

They went to the car parked outside and saw flashlights and heard gunshots, Merritt said. As they climbed into the car, the teens apparently heard somebody yell profanities. Then they were being fired upon.

They fled for about a block, Merritt said, before they noticed there was smoke coming from Jordan’s head. The driver of the car, the boy’s older brother, stopped the car and they flagged down an approaching police cruiser for help.

The civil rights attorney took to Twitter to denounce the officer's actions and express his frustrations with ongoing police brutality. “Another family ripped apart by police brutality,” he wrote on Sunday. “There was absolutely no justification for this murder. We demand justice!”

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.