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Headdresses 2 (Collaged) by Helina Metaferia, 2019. Image courtesy of the artist and PRIZM Art Fair.

Here's What to Expect at This Year's PRIZM Art Fair In Miami

The yearly art fair, now showing at Miami Art Week/Art Basel Miami Beach tackles 'Love In the Time of Hysteria,' with works by artists from across the diaspora.

PRIZM Art Fair is back again for its seventh edition, once again highlighting some of the brightest artists from Africa and the diaspora during Miami Art Week/Art Basel Miami Beach.

This year's exhibit, entitled Love in the Time of Hysteria, features several works curated by William Cordova, Ryan Dennis, Naiomy Guerrero, Oshun Layne as well as PRIZM Art Fair's founder and director Mikhaile Solomon. It includes pieces from 42 international artists, hailing from over 13 different countries, including Barbados, Bahamas, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guyana, Martinique, Morocco, Nigeria, Egypt, Norway, South Africa, Ghana and the United States.

"Love in the Time of Hysteria illustrates how love, compassion and respect endure in a social milieu riddled with divisive political rhetoric, unprovoked attacks on members of marginalized communities and broad societal malaise as a result of economic inequity," said PRIZM in a press release.


Adding that the exhibit seeks to address how the act of love can withstand the social trials of today's world. "Love In the Time of Hysteria questions how these factors can alter and transform our natural disposition to love fully and replace love with a mindset motivated by fear, intolerance, and scarcity. In essence, love and ultimately sanity takes a backseat to the basic need to survive. Love does not only impact our interpersonal relationships but also provides the foundation for flourishing communities. Love, when deployed aptly, lives in the narratives we pass on to our children, sours in the untold and reclaimed histories of our ancestors and builds bridges of understanding between estranged communities."

Prizm Art Fair will take place at the Alfred I. DuPont Building in Downtown Miami, from Dec 2 to 8. Ahead of this year's festivities, we offer you a preview of some of the works showing at this year's fair. Enjoy pieces from Clifton Henri, Helina Metaferia, Dominique Hunter, Zoya Taylor, Nyame Brown and more below. See the full run of events here.

Prosper: to do well, succeed or thrive, 2019 by Latoya Hobbs.

Acrylic, Collage and Relief Carving on Wood Panel48" X 36"Image courtesy of the artist and PRIZM Art Fair

That The Burden Was Never Yours To Bear, 2019 by Dominique Hunter.

Image courtesy of the artist and PRIZM Art Fair

Three-Way Tie by Clifton Henri

Image courtesy of the artist and PRIZM Art Fair

Water by Maya Freelon

Image courtesy of the artist and PRIZM Art Fair

By Nyame Brown

Image courtesy of the artist and PRIZM Art Fair

These Hands Work, 2019, (Kanekalon Hair) by Jazmine Hayes

Image courtesy of the artist and PRIZM Art Fair

If Only All Our Burdens Were Flowers by Zoya Taylor

Image courtesy of the artist and PRIZM Art Fair

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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