News Brief

Protestors in Sudan are Calling for the Removal of President Omar al-Bashir

Hundreds of demonstrators gathered near the capital to protest the leader's 30-year rule and demand "freedom, peace, and justice."

Mass anti-government protests have continued to spread across Sudan.

Demonstrations began in mid-December, with citizens protesting against inflation, food shortages and the rising cost of living, BBC Africa reports. So far dozens of people have reportedly died in clashes between protestors and police. Amnesty International puts the exact number of people killed at 37, while the Sudanese government says 19 people have died, including two soldiers.

There has also been a widespread crackdown on journalists and restrictions placed on social media in an effort to quell demonstrations.


Today, around 300 people took to the streets of the city of Omdurman near the capital, to demand that President Omar al-Bashir step down. The leader has been in power for 30 years, and has been accused of several human rights abuses since taking over the country in a 1989 military coup.

Protestors chanted "freedom, peace and justice" as they left morning prayer, but were later dispersed when officers fired tear gas into the crowd.

Four of the country's largest opposition groups have called for more protests to take place in defiance of the 75-year-old president in the coming days, reports News 24. In a statement, the group announced the organization of a nationwide protest as well as a march on the presidential palace on Sunday.

According to Al Jazeera, the president has ignored calls to step down, despite this wave of protests being one of the biggest challenges to his leadership so far. As The Washington Post reports, the scale of the current protests is unprecedented in Sudan.

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EBRAHIM HAMID/AFP via Getty Images.

Sudan Has Launched an Investigation into Crimes Committed During the Darfur Conflict

The state prosecutor says the investigation will focus on "cases against former regime leaders."

Tagelsir al-Heber, Sudan's state prosecutor, has announced the country's investigation into crimes committed during the Darfur conflict under former President Omar al-Bashir, BBC reports.

The conflict and subsequent crimes committed in the Darfur region from 2003 left around 300,000 people dead and 2.5 million people displaced, France24 adds. Warrants for al-Bashir's arrest were launched by the International Criminal Court (ICC) both in 2009 and 2010 on genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity charges. He has yet to be extradited to face trial for those charges.

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Sudanese women chant slogans during a demonstration demanding a civilian body to lead the transition to democracy, outside the army headquarters in the Sudanese capital Khartoum on April 12, 2019. - Sudanese protestors vowed on April 12 to chase out the country's new military rulers, as the army offered talks on forming a civilian government after it ousted president Omar al-Bashir. (Photo by ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP/Getty Images)

Sudan’s Revolution Isn't a Fluke—It's Tradition

How Sudanese protesters tapped into their country's rich history of revolt to overthrow a dictator.

"The dawn has come, Atbara has arrived"

This was the chant bellowed by hundreds of people in Khartoum on Tuesday, April 23, as they tearfully welcomed in the train from Atbara, a city 300 kilometers away from the capital. The train was not only filled to capacity, it was overflowing with citizens both inside and on top of the train waving victory signs, posters, banners and Sudanese flags. The videos and stills from that day recorded a historic moment—and a full circle one, harkening back to the first major protest five months earlier on December 19, 2018.

On the other side of the world, I sat in front of my computer screen watching the train roll in and cried, for what felt like the millionth time that week.

Since April 6, the international community has been trying to understand what's happening in Sudan—its scope and significance.

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"Zion 9, 2018" (inkjet on Hahnemuhle photo rag)" by Mohau Modisakeng. Photo courtesy of Jenkins Johnson Gallery.

South African Artist Mohau Modisakeng Makes Solo NYC Debut With 'A Promised Land'

The artist will present the video installation 'ZION' and other works centering on the "global history of displacement of Black communities" at the Jenkins Johnson Gallery in Brooklyn.

Renowned South African visual artist Mohau Modisakeng presents A Promised Land, his latest solo exhibition, opening at Brooklyn's Jenkins Johnson Gallery this month. This marks the New York debut of Modisakeng's ZION video installation, based on the artists's 2017 performance art series by the same name. It originally debuted at the Performa Biennial.

"In ZION the artist deals with the relationship between body, place and the global history of displacement of Black communities," reads a press release. "There is an idea that all people are meant to belong somewhere, yet in reality there are millions of people who are unsettled, in search of refuge, migrating across borders and landscapes for various reasons."

In addition to the video, the show also features seven large-scale photographs that communicate themes of Black displacement. From 19th century Black settlements in New York City, which as the press release notes, were eradicated to clear space for the development of Central Park, to the scores of Africans who have faced conflict that has led them to life as refugees in foreign lands.

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Rema in "Beamer (Bad Boys)" (Youtube)

The 10 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Tony Allen x Hugh Masekela, Sarkodie, Rema, Costa Titch x Riky Rick x AKA and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our best music of the week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Check out all of OkayAfrica's playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

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