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'RAFIKI' Director Wanuri Kahiu Is Suing Kenya's Film Board to Make Way for Oscars Qualification

The Kenyan filmmaker continues to fight for her film to be screened in her home country.

Wanuri Kahiu's RAFIKI has received its due praise on the film festival circuit since her film was selected to make its world premiere at Cannes earlier this year—making it the first Kenyan feature film to do so. However, the Kenya Film Classification Board has since banned the film, citing that it "seeks to legitimize lesbian romance."

Kahiu's fight for RAFIKI to be screened in her home country has not ceased, as she announced this week at TIFF that herself and a cohort of Kenyan artists have filed a lawsuit against the board, Vanity Fair reports.


The suit demands the ban imposed on the film to be lifted in time for her to submit the film to be considered for an Oscar. It's also pushing to change the law that has been used to ban popular films and cartoons like The Wolf of Wall Street and Adventure Time.

"I don't necessarily consider myself an activist; I truly consider myself a storyteller," Kahiu says at TIFF, where her film made its North American debut. "But when somebody starts to infringe on your rights to be creative and exercise your work, that becomes a problem. That's when we decided to push back and take the Classification Board to court."

For RAFIKI to be eligible for a Best Foreign Language award, it needs to be shown in Kenya before September 30, The Hollywood Reporter adds. If the selection committee is given permission to screen the film to submit it to the Academy, RAFIKI could be the first Kenyan film to be nominated in that category.

"It's not a government's right to say what you can imagine and what you cannot imagine," Kahiu adds. "And who is allowed to exist. That's not a way that you can run a country, because we're made up of diverse people."

READ: Wanuri Kahiu Speaks on the Overwhelming Response to 'RAFIKI' at Cannes

Nasty C Shares Stunning Visuals For ‘Palm Trees’

Nasty C releases stunning neon visuals for 'Palm Trees' from his highly anticipated album which is now available for preorder/pre-add.

South African rapper, Nasty C has released a hot new video for "Palm Trees". The single comes off his eagerly anticipated album Zulu Man With Some Power which drops at the end of August on Def Jam Recordings and Universal Music Group Africa.

"Palm Trees" is just over two minutes long but its visuals will linger for longer. The high quality video flashes high energy neon visuals fitting for the upbeat track. Creatively led by South African Karl Lewis, who has directed adverts for BMW and Toya DeLazy's afrorave song "Funani", the video is simply crisp and clean. Superimposed sexy women, glowing spiders and scorpions, expensive cars and a neon painted man jerking on beat make this a signature rap video.

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Image courtesy of artist.

AKA’s Visuals for ‘Monuments’ is the #StayAtHome Content We Signed up For

AKA shares slick, psychedelic montage for 'Monuments' featuring Grandmaster Ready and Yanga Chief.

AKA's "Monuments" music video is the #stayathome content you need in your life. Supa Mega's latest music video is an inside look at how the star spends his day during the current lockdown. The single is part of a series of releases along with "Cross My Heart" and "Energy", which all will be part of his upcoming project.

The video is a 5-minute montage of AKA making breakfast and punch, sitting on the kitchen counter, relaxing on the stars, playing video games all while rapping to scratchy smooth Hip-hop beats reminiscent of early 90's hip hop—Grandmaster Ready D's cuts add to the nostalgic feel.

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Image courtesy of Showmax.

‘Joko ya Hao’ is Not Your Typical Apartheid Film

South African filmmaker Mmabatho Montsho doesn't rely on the politics of her new film to carry it along, but instead imposes her authorial voice on a tribute to Winnie Madikizela Mandela.

The defining flaw of the post-94 apartheid film is always its focus on the macro—the issues, the big political figureheads and so forth. The recently released short film Joko ya Hao (currently streaming on Showmax) signifies a continued stepping away from this conventional wisdom towards a more nuanced history from below.

Filmmaker Mmabatho Montsho does not linger on black pain, towering over it pornographically on Joho ya Hao. Instead, she zooms in; we see crying eyes and an attempt to wash hands red with blood. The objective is not to generate mere anger at the political moment as most films tend to do, but to do the more challenging work of making the viewer intimately aware of its human costs.

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