Popular

Raila Odinga Just Declared Himself the 'People's President' of Kenya In a Makeshift Swearing In Ceremony

Opposition leader Raila Odinga declared himself the "people's president" of Kenya on Tuesday.

Who is the rightful president of Kenya?

Well, many believed it was long-standing Uhuru Kenyatta, after he beat main opposition leader, Raila Odinga in an unprecedented election rerun last October, but it seems Odinga—after having accused his rival of election tampering and initiating the rerun—remained discontent with the outcome. He argued that no true reform had occurred within Kenya's election committee, and urged his supporters to continue to challenge the results.


The opposition leader led his own psuedo-inauguration on Tuesday morning, in which he declared himself the "people's president," reports BBC Africa.

The ceremony was attended by some of his most loyal supporters, who participated despite threats from the government that it would be considered treason if they were to do so.

The national government refused to broadcast the event on television.

During the ceremony, Odinga declared that he has a "high[er] calling to assume the office of the people's president of the Republic of Kenya." But many are calling the ordeal a blatant publicity stunt.

According to BBC Africa, the event lasted just 20 minutes, and Mr. Odinga left his supporters confused and wanting more out of the affair. Though the event was considered illegal by the government, some argue that nothing took place that they law doesn't allow for, as Kenyans reserve the constitutional right to exercise their power directly through peaceful assembly.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Watch Focalistic & Vigro Deep’s New Music Video For ‘Ke Star’

The 'Lockdown Level 1 anthem' has come to life through fire visuals.