Photos

The Rain Couldn't Stop What Was An Epic July 4th EVERYDAY AFRIQUE with South Africa's AKA

It was a lituation of a July 4th at EVERYDAY AFRIQUE.

Okayafrica and our friends over at Everyday People teamed up again with this year's July 4th edition of EVERYDAY AFRIQUE at Brooklyn's Output.


The rooftop and club overflowed with dancing feet and good vibes, despite the rain that preempted the beautiful fireworks that illuminated the sky and the East River (we kept the party going anyway!).

If you noticed sprinkles of face and body paint designs throughout the crowd, that was much thanks to Laolu Senbanjo and his beautiful Sacred Art of the Ori. The tunes—from South African house, afrobeats and azonto, to soca and dancehall—were brought to you by DJs mOma, Rich Knight, Kashaka and Underdog.

South Africa came through and rolled deep to support their own, Mr. Super Mega, AKA. His brief, but lit set brought the house down where the Jozi native performed the likes of "All Eyes on Me," "Run Jozi (Godly)" and "Congratulate." 

But enough talking, it's time for you to see what went down on this epic day below, brought to you by Leon Williams, Rim G. for 77xpressionsimageryJohnette Reed and Ginny Suss:

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Leon Williams.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Johnette Reed.

Photo by Rim G. for 77expressionsimagery.

Photo by Rim G. for 77expressionsimagery.

Photo by Rim G. for 77expressionsimagery.

Photo by Rim G. for 77expressionsimagery.

Photo by Rim G. for 77expressionsimagery.

Photo by Rim G. for 77expressionsimagery.

Photo by Rim G. for 77expressionsimagery.

Photo by Ginny Suss.

Photo by Ginny Suss.

Photo by Ginny Suss.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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