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RIP Vine: Watch the 17 Funniest African Vines Here

The internet will never be the same. Check out our favorite African vines of all time.

We're saddened to hear today's news that in the next coming months, Vine will no longer be with us.


*insert several sobbing emojis here*

This app changed the viral content game when it launched in 2013—where the funniest and most engaging looping videos grabbed our eyes for what it felt like hours at a time.

Vine says in their statement that there are plans to keep the website online and plans to keep creators informed about the platform's next steps.

The app was the home to the online African comedians we now know so well—Chief Obi, AphricanApe, SamTakesOff and DreaKnowsBest to name a few.

As Africans we had our own hashtag communities—#AfricanParentsBeLike and #AfricansBeLike—where our tears of laughter brought us together knowing that we were never alone in our experiences being raised by African immigrants.

As we mourn the loss of the app that gave us Bobby Shmurda dancing to Sade, the cute ballerina doing her thing for the Vine and 'Why You Lyin,'" take a look at our favorite African Vines below:

Interview
Photo: Mariela Alvarez.

Interview: ÌFÉ Blends Music & Religion to Honor Those Who Have Died During the Pandemic

Producer and percussionist Otura Mun talks about his latest EP, The Living Dead, and how he traces the influences of West Africa in his new work.

There are bands that open up a spiritual world through their music. ÌFÉ is one example. An electro-futurist band that fuses Afro-Cuban rhythms and Jamaican dancehall with Yoruba mystical voices. With the success of their 2017 debut album "IIII+IIII" (pronounced Eji-Ogbe), ÌFÉ has reached an audience that is looking for Caribbean and contemporary sounds.

The Puerto Rican-based band just released a new EP, The Living Dead- Ashé Bogbo Egun, that aims to heal and honor those who have died during this pandemic. Otura Mun, the band leader, is an African-American producer and percussionist, who began a personal journey about a decade ago, when he landed in San Juan, and decided to move there. He learned Spanish, dug deep into his African ancestry and started to practice the Yoruba-Caribbean religion of Santería.

ÌFÉ, which means "love and expansion" in Yoruba, ties two worlds, music and religion, artistically. This new EP modernized prayer songs to hopefully make them more accessible to a younger generation. OkayAfrica spoke with Otura Mun on his latest work.

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