Audio

East African DJ Collective Santuri Safari's Uganda Exclusives

East African DJ collective Santuri Safari premieres hip-hop and house tracks recorded at a pop up studio at DoaDoa in Iganga, Uganda.


Photo of Saint Evo The Myth by Link Reuben for Sauti za Busara

Santuri Safari are a loose collective of DJs, producers and musicians based in East Africa. Responding to what they perceive to be contemporary East African music's identity crisis in the face of global influences (specifically citing the influence of mainstream hip-hop and R&B), the project brings electronic and hip-hop DJs/producers together with local musicians to make "underground" electronic dance music in east Africa. So far they've run production workshops and studio sessions in Zanzibar (at the Sauti Za Busara Festival) and Uganda (at the DoaDoa Festival). Later this month they'll set up their third pop up studio at Kenya's Rift Valley Festival in partnership with Nairobi creative hub Creatives Garage. Ahead of the event, the Santuri team shared two tracks with us recorded at their DoaDoa sessions in Iganga, Uganda, back in April.

First up is a pan-East African hip-hop collaboration entitled "Tusimame." Building on a foundation of samples recorded from a mbaire xylophone, Dar-based producer Ambrose “Dunga” Akwabi and Kampala producer/rapper DJ Rachael teamed up on a call for east Africa's hip-hop community to stand up. Ugandan crooner Giovanni Kremer Kiyingi lays down an easy breezy hook while six rappers from across the region (Reco Lyco, 
Ram Emcee, Ugly Emcee, Shamsila, DJ Rachael, and Bamulumba Yasin aka Jungle De Maneater) lend freestyled verses in Luganda, Swahili, Luga and Luso dialects. Listen on below and watch Santuri sound engineer Sam Jones break down the process behind the xylophone sample in a video here.

"Kanekasi (Esa's Dark Meme Remix)" is proper club music that uses the same xylophone sample as "Tusimame." Ugandan folk artist Joel Sebunjo, though known for his kora playing, contributes vocals as Giovanni Kremer Kiyingi and Kenya's Sarabi lend their fiddle and guitar to production from Nairobi's Celsius Degree head honch Saint Evo The Myth, Kampala's DJ Ivo and UK/South Africa's Auntie Flo collaborator Esa Williams. Ambrose (Akula Akwabi), Esa and Uganda’s Dark Meme (Ken Mvvalye) tagteam on a psychedelic house remix, which you can listen to below.

Find out more about Santuri Safari via their facebook page here. Their next pop up studio hits Kenya's Rift Valley Festival August 29th-31st.

Featured
Seun Kuti at Felabration. Photo: OkayAfrica.

The 10 Best African Music Festivals

Here are ten of the best music festivals to experience across the African continent, including both established stages and newer productions.

African music, in all its genres and forms, has one of the largest congregations in the world, with millions of people both on the continent and in the diaspora celebrating their love and connection to their culture through sound. Despite the rapid digitization of our music consumption through the internet and streaming services, nothing will ever beat the experience of live music.

Music festivals have become a great inlet into the arts and cultures of the societies that host them, while offering great potential to local economies and countless business opportunities for African artists to grown their brands. Yet this pivotal part of the music experience on the continent is never really prioritized, despite the vast number of festival with diverse genres available all year round, all over Africa.

READ: Stormzy Will Headline South Africa's 'Rocking the Daisies' Festival 2020

Therefore, in no particular order, here are ten African music festivals to bookmark.

Keep reading... Show less
Photos

25 Beautiful Photos From East Africa's Biggest Music Festival, Sauti za Busara

Zanzibar's famous Sauti za Busara ('Sound of Wisdom') festival is widely regarded as one of the best music festivals in East Africa.

Zanzibar's famous Sauti za Busara ('Sound of Wisdom') festival is widely regarded as one of the best music festivals in East Africa.

Keep reading... Show less
popular

14 Cultural Events You Can't Miss this December in South Africa

OkayAfrica's guide to must-see events during South Africa's festive season.

South Africans will tell you that December is not just a month, it's an entire lifestyle. From beginning to end, it's about being immersed in a ton of activity with friends and family as well as any new folk you meet along the way. Whether you're looking to turn up to some good music or watch some provocative theater, our guide to just 14 cultural events happening in South Africa this December, has something for everyone.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.