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Senegal's Aliou Cisse is the Only Black Coach at the World Cup & He's Totally Worth Celebrating

"I'm certain that one day an African team, an African country, will win the World Cup," says the celebrated coach.

Senegal's win over Poland during their first World Cup 2018 match still has folks celebrating, and rightfully so.

The Lions of Taranga won 2-1 against the European team on Tuesday in Moscow. Not only are the team's agile players being praised for the win, but heir coach Aliou Cisse is receiving an outpouring of love on social media as well.

The accomplished Cisse, led Senegal to the World Cup quarter-finals in 2002 as the team's captain. He became the team's coach in 2015, and is currently the only black head coach at the World Cup.


Senegals win was the first for an African team at this year's World Cup, and the significance of this is certainly not lost on the coach, who at 42, is also one of the youngest coaches at the tournament.

"Senegal represents the whole African continent," he said told Independent UK. "We are Senegal but I can guarantee the whole of Africa is supporting the Senegal team. I get calls and lots of people are proud and we are proud to represent the African continent."

He also expressed his support for other African teams, and his belief in their capabilities.

"It's a little bit too early. Winning first match of course means you start at the right pace. The second and third match are also important. I hope Egypt, Nigeria, Tunisia and Morcoco will stand up. There is a lot of quality in the other African teams."

"I'm certain that one day an African team, an African country, will win the World Cup," he told BBC Sport.

Gifs of his celebratory fist pump and impassioned gestures during the game have also been making the rounds on social media since Senegal's win. They've become prime meme material.



Senegal's team and their outstanding coach are endeared to Africans everywhere. The Lions' next match is against Japan on June 24, and we will be enthusiastically watching and rooting for them.

Photo by Minasse Wondimu Hailu/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images.

The African Union Condemns Violence Against #EndSARS Protesters in Nigeria

The African Union Commission chairperson has (finally) condemned the deadly violence against protesters calling for an end to police brutality in Nigeria. However, many feel the body's declaration is a little too late.

EWN reports that the African Union (AU) Commission chairperson Moussa Faki Mahamat has "strongly condemned the violence that erupted on 20 October 2020 during protests in Lagos, Nigeria that has resulted in multiple deaths and injuries." However, Mahamat's statement did not specifically denounce the actions of the security forces' actions. This past Tuesday, protesters calling for the disbandment of the infamous and an end to police brutality, were shot at by security forces at Lekki Toll Gate. The incident occurred shortly after an abrupt 24-hour curfew had been imposed by the State Governor, Babajide Sanwo-Olu, the AU has called for all involved "political and social actors to reject the use of violence and respect human rights and the rule of law" and recommended that they "privilege dialogue".
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How Technology Is Playing a Crucial Role in the #EndSARS Protests

Young people in Nigeria have successfully managed to use technological innovations to organize and make the #EndSARS protests run incredibly efficiently and easily. This moment will go down in history as a revolution that was birthed via technology.

It has been more than a week since young people in Nigeria took to the streets to demand that the Special Anti-Robbery Squad, infamously known as SARS, be scrapped for good. Created in 1992, this police unit was originally set up to beat back armed robbery, the use of firearms and rising cases of kidnappings that grew in the late eighties. However, the unit went rogue, becoming more notorious for its savagery than actual crime-fighting. With a rap sheet ranging from profiling, harassment and assault to, in more extreme cases, slaughtering innocent citizens, these quasi-officers have unleashed terror on the nation for more than two decades.

Their victims are predominantly young Nigerians profiled on appearance—whether they drive exotic vehicles, use the latest gadgets, have their hair dyed or locked, or have piercings. In some cases, working in tech often gets conflated with financial fraud. For people who don't meet the absurd criteria, the mood of the officer can often become the difference between life and death.

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Emile YX? Wants to 'Reconnect The String'

The father of South African hip-hop's latest book release is here to teach you about the culture.

As a father-figure in South African hip-hop, there's a lot Emile Lester Jansen, aka Emile YX?, knows. He'll also tell you, there's a lot he doesn't. But the knowledge Emile has gained, over his 3 decades in music, he's always tried to share with others. His latest project is no different. The Black Noise founder is working on a book that identifies the similarities between Bushmen expression and hip-hop, and how this knowledge can help empower anyone who has a love of the culture.

The book, which will be called Reconnect The String, comes on the back of this year's 21st anniversary of the African Hip Hop Indaba, one of the landmark hip hop events in Cape Town created by Emile, which has helped many an artist launch their career. As a teacher and a musician, he's long been involved in using hip hop to uplift communities—first through the seminal group Black Noise, founded in the late 1980s, with its rhymes rallying against Apartheid, and then through the Heal the Hood organization, a non-profit that grew out of the group's efforts to use its love of hip hop to fuel youth development initiatives in townships on the Cape Flats.

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Interview: Sango's ‘Da Rocinha 4’ Is a Polished & Grinding Take On Baile Funk

We speak with the Seattle-based DJ and producer about his new album and the music bridges connecting Brazil, the US and the world.