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Senegal's Aliou Cisse is the Only Black Coach at the World Cup & He's Totally Worth Celebrating

"I'm certain that one day an African team, an African country, will win the World Cup," says the celebrated coach.

Senegal's win over Poland during their first World Cup 2018 match still has folks celebrating, and rightfully so.

The Lions of Taranga won 2-1 against the European team on Tuesday in Moscow. Not only are the team's agile players being praised for the win, but heir coach Aliou Cisse is receiving an outpouring of love on social media as well.

The accomplished Cisse, led Senegal to the World Cup quarter-finals in 2002 as the team's captain. He became the team's coach in 2015, and is currently the only black head coach at the World Cup.


Senegals win was the first for an African team at this year's World Cup, and the significance of this is certainly not lost on the coach, who at 42, is also one of the youngest coaches at the tournament.

"Senegal represents the whole African continent," he said told Independent UK. "We are Senegal but I can guarantee the whole of Africa is supporting the Senegal team. I get calls and lots of people are proud and we are proud to represent the African continent."

He also expressed his support for other African teams, and his belief in their capabilities.

"It's a little bit too early. Winning first match of course means you start at the right pace. The second and third match are also important. I hope Egypt, Nigeria, Tunisia and Morcoco will stand up. There is a lot of quality in the other African teams."

"I'm certain that one day an African team, an African country, will win the World Cup," he told BBC Sport.

Gifs of his celebratory fist pump and impassioned gestures during the game have also been making the rounds on social media since Senegal's win. They've become prime meme material.



Senegal's team and their outstanding coach are endeared to Africans everywhere. The Lions' next match is against Japan on June 24, and we will be enthusiastically watching and rooting for them.

Interview

Interview: Terri Is Stepping Out of the Shadows

We talk to the Wizkid-signed artist about the story behind the massive hit "Soco" and his latest Afro Series EP.

Certain afrobeats songs have made in-roads in international markets and paved the way for the genre's ceaselessly-rising widespread recognition. Among these history-defining songs were D'banj's "Oliver Twist," Tekno's "Pana," Davido's "If" & "Fall," Runtown's "Mad Over You," and of course, Wizkid's "Soco." Wizkid released "Soco" under his label imprint, Starboy Entertainment in March 2018, and the song spread like wildfire across Africa and beyond. "Soco" was an Afro-pop wonder delivered at a time when the 'afrobeats to the world' movement was gathering steam, further cementing its electric nature. The Northboi-produced song was co-signed by celebrities across the world like Rihanna, Cardi B, and Paul Pogba and has accrued well over a hundred million streams across streaming platforms worldwide.

"Soco" was not only a trailblazer amongst mid-2010s afrobeats records, it was also the introduction of the first Wizkid-signed artist, Terri. Just weeks before "Soco" was released, Terri was discovered by Wizkid's longtime producer, Mutay, who saw him covering the song "Oshe" on social media.

Before "Soco," Terri Akewe was well on his way to fame. At fifteen, he had performed at street carnivals in his neighbourhood and, one time, was carried all the way home by neighbours after winning a Coca-Cola sponsored singing competition. Before his life-changing meeting with Wizkid, Terri had a seven-track EP ready for release, as well as a viral song titled "Voices." "One time I was on set with the video director T.G Omori, he told me that 'Voices' was the first time he heard of me" Terri tells me as we settle on a plush couch at his home in Lagos.

Regardless of Terri's initial career trajectory; signing to a label headed by afrobeats' biggest superstar was bound to accelerate his musical journey, and at the same time, cast a huge shadow of expectation on his career, especially given a debut as spectacular as "Soco." With his latest EP, Afro Series, powered by the sensational single "Ojoro," one thing is clear: Terri is stepping out of the shadows into his own spotlight and he is doing it on his own terms.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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Interview
Photo: Black Butter/Sony UK.

Interview: JAE5 Is Crafting London's Distinct Diasporic Sound

We talk to the buzzing producer about his Grammy win alongside Burna Boy, his work with J Hus and the ever-looming influence of Ghana.

When tales about the origins of hip-hop come into the cypher, the hyperfocus is almost always about the culture being born out of a unique and profound struggle that centers Black and Indigenous youth in the Bronx. First and second generational youth with roots in both the English and Spanish-speaking Caribbean, who in spite of their deteriorating environment — at the time some of the most impoverished streets in North America — learned to harness the power of creative ingenuity as a form of survival.

We can, arguably, deduce then that the original purveyors of this music that was made from scratch — quite literally — weren't actually intending on making music that could speak for or represent a people and their stories. No. I'd wager the first DJs worrying the vinyls on Uptown blocks, and the first MCs spitting outside corner bodegas were simply living, relishing in the little joy they could manifest for themselves. Two-stepping and waving braggadocio hands in the few darkened spaces that welcomed them.

For JAE5 (born Jonathan Mensah) one of today's most prolific producers on the other side of the Atlantic, creating a fresh UK sound that in many ways is an expression of contemporary African British youth, it was not intentional. It was simply inevitable.

"I lived in Ghana for three years. J Hus grew up around a lot of Ghanaians. All of our friends are African and our parents are African," he shares. "So even when we were trying to make music from the UK, it would always have an African influence because that's what we grew up listening to and that's who we are. So I don't think anything was intentional. It's what it is."

With origins in Ghana and a coming-of-age set in London, JAE5 first became known as the genre-splicing beat machine behind J Hus' intoxicating songs, including the summer smash of 2017 "Did You See" off his Common Sense album. Having executive produced J Hus' entire debut album, JAE5 made a name for himself as the East Londoner developing a distinct diasporic sound combining elements of hip-hop, afrobeats and afro-fusion.

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Joeboy Recruits Kwesi Arthur on Remix of 'Door' & Music Video

Joeboy enlists Kwesi Arthur on the new remix to his single 'Door' and shares the accompanying visuals.

Nigerian artist Joeboy has recently dropped the remix to his single "Door" as well as the music video. He recruits Ghanaian artist Kwesi Arthur on both the remix as well as the accompanying visuals for the track. The original version of "Door" features on Joeboy's 14-track debut album Somewhere Between Beauty & Magic which was released at the beginning of February this year.

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Students from Nigeria's Greenfield University Abducted

At least 20 students are missing and one staff member dead after gunmen recently attacked Nigeria's Greenfield University.