Video

Nas’ Breakdancing Documentary Reveals Stirring Clip Of Ugandan B-Boy [Exclusive]

Nas' breakdancing documentary 'Shake The Dust' reveals a stirring clip of Ugandan b-boy Fahadhi Kiryowa.


Still courtesy of BOND/360

Last month we reported that Shake The Dust, Nas' new feature-length documentary about breakdancing's  global influence, had made its online debut over on Vimeo. Executive produced by Mr. Nasir Jones himself and helmed by journalist-turned-director and photographer Adam Sjöberg, the 84-minute film chronicles the stories of rappers, DJs, and b-boys across Uganda, Yemen, Colombia and Cambodia. Ahead of the film's premiere this Friday, we're excited to share an exclusive clip with you all today, in which we meet a young Ugandan breakdancer by the name of Fahadhi Kiryowa.

Sjöberg first started filming Shake The Dust in Kampala in 2010 after connecting with Breakdance Project Uganda founder Abramz Tekya. Speaking on the country's hip-hop scene, Sjöberg tells us that "Thanks to Abramz and the work of Breakdance Project Uganda, the breaking scene is vibrant and growing. Abramz has helped educate youth all over Uganda of the history of hip-hop, its pillars, and how to use it to empower and enliven individuals and communities," he said over email. "The overall hip-hop scene in Uganda is continuing to grow - with rap artists and dancers popping up every day - creating music videos and names for themselves, often starting with very little. Artists like Ruyonga are helping continue to spread Uganda’s reputation as a pure hip-hop giant across East Africa."

BOND/360 will theatrically release 'Shake The Dust' this Friday, May 15th, in L.A. at the TCL Chinese Theater. This will be followed by a limited theatrical release. The film will be available on Itunes and additional VOD outlets on May 19.

Interview

Interview: Wavy The Creator Is Ready to See You Now

The multidisciplinary Nigerian-American artist on tapping into all her creative outlets, creating interesting things, releasing a new single and life during quarantine.

A trip canceled, plans interrupted, projects stalled. It is six months now since Wavy the Creator has had to make a stop at an undisclosed location to go into quarantine and get away from the eye of the pandemic.

The professional recording artist, photographer, writer, fashion artist, designer, and evolving creative has been spending all of this time in a house occupied by other creatives. This situation is ideal. At least for an artist like Wavy who is always in a rapid motion of creating and bringing interesting things to life. The energy around the house is robust enough to tap from and infuse into any of her numerous creative outlets. Sometimes, they also inspire trips into new creative territories. Most recently, for Wavy, are self-taught lessons on a bass guitar.

Wavy's days in this house are not without a pattern, of course. But some of the rituals and personal rules she drew up for herself, like many of us did for internal direction, at the beginning of the pandemic have been rewritten, adjusted, and sometimes ditched altogether. Some days start early and end late. Some find her at her sewing machine fixing up thrift clothes to fit her taste, a skill she picked up to earn extra cash while in college, others find her hard at work in the studio, writing or recording music.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

The 10 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Wizkid, Alicia Keys x Diamond Platnumz, Manu WorldStar, Maya Amolo, La Dame Blanche and more.