Audio

The 4 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Check out the best tracks, videos, mixtapes and releases that came across our desks this week.

At the end of every week, we’ll be highlighting the creme of the crop in music and rounding up the best tracks, videos, mixtapes and releases that came across our desks throughout the last few days.


Check out this week’s selections below.

IYO and Diamond Platnumz' new joint

Nigerian singer IYO and Tanzanian star Diamond Platnumz' join forces for their new collaboration, "Loving You."

The Masterkraft-produced single is a burst of energy propelled by dance floor-ready beats, over which both artists showcase their tendency for writing some solid pop hooks.

Check out the lighthearted, Mex-directed music video for the track above.

Vanessa Mdee's got the cash

Tanzania went in this week. Vanessa Mdee , who killed her set at our NYC Sauti Sol concert, comes through with her latest music video for "Cash Madame," a track produced by Nigeria's EKelly.

"This anthem is a declaration of Independence for all the hard working, forward thinking, thought provoking fly girls of the world and the men who are NOT afraid of a strong girl," the single's description reads.

The song's video, which was shot by Justin Campos, features all the flyings bills, acrobatic dances and robbery scenes that you can expect from a track called "Cash Madame."

Blitz the Ambassador's "Hello Africa"

Blitz the Ambassador dropped "Hello Africa," the latest leak from his upcoming Diasporadical album—from which we've previously seen the gorgeous video trilogy of "Shine," "Juju Girl" and "Running."

"Hello Africa" sees Blitz in travel-mode as he takes lyrical stops across Marrakesh, Kigali, Dakar, Lagos, Joburg, and more over this Optiks beat.

"I wrote this song while traveling around Africa this year" Blitz adds, "Almost every city I mentioned was from firsthand experience."

Alsarah & The Nubatones' NPR Tiny Desk concert

Sudanese singer Alsarah and her band The Nubatones brought their blend of East African retro pop to NPR's Tiny Desk concerts.

While there, the group was captured performing some hypnotizing and stripped-down renditions of tracks like "Ya Watan," "3roos Elneel," and "Fulani."

Alsarah's featured in our long read on 4 Artists From the New School of Sudanese Music, which you should definitely check out.

While you're at it, revisit Alsarah's 10 Things I Love About Sudan.

News Brief
Photo by Giles Clarke/UNOCHA via Getty Images

Cameroon Holds Vigil to Remember Children Killed in School Attack

Residents in Kumba paid their respects to the seven lives lost, and those injured during the attack over the weekend.

In the latest tragedy to come from Cameroon's historically violent clash between Anglo and Francophone citizens, seven children were murdered after attackers stormed a school with guns and machetes over the weekend.

In what has been deemed as the "darkest and saddest day," by Bishop Agapitus Nfon of Kumba, armed attackers stormed the Mother Francisca International Bilingual Academy, targeting students aged 9 to 12. The tragic event saw dozens of children injured, some critically.

The attack has shocked the nation, with both local and international agencies condemning the horrible offense. On Monday, Cameroonian President Paul Biya denounced the "horrific murder" of the school children, and alluded to the "appropriate measures" being taken in order to bring justice to the families of the victims. Prime Minister Dion Ngute Joseph shared his condolences via a tweet saying, "I bow before the memory of these innocent kids."

The Cameroonian presidency and governing body have blamed Anglophone 'separatists' for the attack, though the group claims no part in the attack.

Human rights groups, however, have blamed both opposing parties, as the conflict has led to the death of over 3,000 deaths and resulted in more than 700,000 Cameroonians fleeing their homes and the country.

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Interview: Meet Velemseni, Eswatini’s Queen of Soul

Soul artist Velemseni's music reflects Eswatini culture and aesthetics. "The Kingdom of Eswatini is a magical and mysterious place, and my music aims to interpret and document that mystique, drawing from genres like Swazi gospel, soul, African soul, cinematic and traditional music," says the artist.