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Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

AKA is one of the South African artists who aren't satisfied with government's relief fund for artists.

South Africans Are Not Impressed by Government’s Second Wave of Artist Relief Fund

South African freelancers feel left out and artists feel the money allocated by the government as relief is too little.

South African Minister for Sports, Arts and Recreation Nathi Mthethwa has announced a second wave of funding for South African artists and athletes. R77 million has been allocated to assist artists whose sole income comes from economic participation in the creative industries.

The announcement comes after the first wave of funding which was released shortly after the nation was put under lockdown in March. Mthwetha reported that artists are eligible for an allocated amount of R2,200 per month much to the dismay of popular and unpopular artists.


Read: Struggling Creatives in South Africa's Film & Television Industry to Get Relief

The application criteria for artists who have lost jobs due to Covid-19 officially includes freelancers, but many on Twitter have refuted the government's claim stating that in the first wave of funding which was over R150 million, freelancers' applications were not considered. Fears that the second wave would do the same have popped up.

Freelancers are not the only ones unhappy with how the government has rolled out the relief. Outspoken South African rapper AKA's response to the minister's announcements have been firing Twitter up.

While some thought AKA's tweet carried an air of arrogance, he defended himself by explaining that he is a self-employed artist who is trying to avoid losing his staff.

House music and radio veteran, DJ Fresh called the measly amount allocated to artists "carnage".

As the world continues to reel from the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, many South African creatives are still struggling to keep their heads above water. A gross amount R65 million is allocated for sports. South African celebrities Bonang, Somizi and Black Coffee have collectively decided to roll up their sleeves and raise funds for the undervalued arts sector.
Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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