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South Africa's New Miss SA Has Renewed Conversation Around the Politics of Black Hair

The beauty pageant winner is the first to be crowned while rocking her natural hair in the contest's 60-year history.

The Miss SA contest is perhaps one of the biggest and most highly anticipated annual beauty pageants in South Africa. In its six-decade run, the pageant has evolved considerably. From Jacqui Mofokeng, the first Black woman ever to clinch the coveted title back in 1993 to Sibabalwe Gcilitshana, the first openly queer contestant in the 2019 edition of the contest, the pageant has certainly made strides.

This year's winner, Zozibini Tunzi, becomes the first Black woman to be crowned while rocking her natural hair. While this may not seem like such a big deal, the debates that have been sparked on South African social media show the need to continue the conversation around the politics of Black hair, especially in a country such as South Africa.


"Here sits the crown, beautifully so on my kinky coarse hair. I hope I make South Africa proud." These are the words that Tunzi wrote in a post on Instagram after winning this year's Miss SA title last week Friday.

Many South Africans, celebrities included, have since expressed their delight with the crowning of a Black woman wearing her hair in its naturally kinky state. One would think that in 2019, Black hair in its natural state wouldn't be so exceptionalized and yet it is. Three years ago, students from Pretoria Girls' High School protested the racist policies the school had with regards to Black hair. As a result, many South African women, young and old, spoke out about their own personal encounters with similar policies during their schooling days.

While the conversation on social media has also quickly highlighted that Tunzi was not crowned 2019's Miss SA simply because she chose to rock her natural hair, what is important to note is how natural Black hair is still not as accepted in the mainstream as its silky and straight alternatives. And in no way is this about having the tired "weaves/wigs versus natural hair" debate especially as it pertains to how "African" one is (that's silly), but rather shining the spotlight on how Black hair is still very much political and how moments like this only serve to reaffirm that.

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Watch Reason and Ginger Trill’s Music Video for Their Politically Charged Single ‘Cashless Society’

Reason and Ginger Trill share grimy visuals for 'Cashless Society.'

Reason has finally released the visuals for "Cashless Society," one of the strongest songs in his latest album, 2018's Azania.

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Photo by Alet Pretorius/Gallo Images via Getty Images

The Ndlovu Youth Choir Wins the Hollywood Music in Media Award

South Africa's favorite choir continues on its winning streak.

The Ndlovu Youth Choir continues to fly the South African flag high. Recently, the choir was awarded the Hollywood Music in Media Award in the category of "Best Independent Music Video" alongside Grammy award-winning South African flautist, Wouter Kellerman, for their Zulu rendition of Ed Sheeran's "Shape of You".

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Stormzy, Ed Sheeran and Burna Boy in "Own It" (Youtube)

Stormzy Recruits Burna Boy & Ed Sheeran For 'Own It'

Watch the new music video from Stormzy's upcoming new album.

Stormzy is readying the release of his second album, Heavy Is the Head, due December 13.

He's now come through with the new music video and single for "Own It," an electronic head-nodder collaboration with the Burna Boy and Ed Sheeran.

The addictive new song is accompanied by a new music video, directed by Nathan James Tettey. It follows Stormzy, Burna Boy, and Ed Sheeran as they perform on rainy London rooftops, warehouses and club dance floors—simply put, it looks like a fun time.

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(Photo credit should read PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP via Getty Images)

#SayNoToSocialMediaBill: Nigerians Protest Proposed Law Allowing Government to Block the Internet

Nigerians are saying no to the 'Protection from Internet Falsehood and Manipulation Bill' that they say will give the government the power to silence them.

A bill that could limit democratic expression amongst social media users in Nigeria, has been proposed in the senate for the second time this year, Techcabal reports. Several Nigerians are now speaking out against it.

The bill, called the "Protection from Internet Falsehood and Manipulation Bill 2019 (SB 132)," would essentially allow the government to shutdown the internet whenever it sees fit. It was proposed by Senator Muhammadu Sani Musa of the ruling All Progressives Congress (APC), who claimed that the measure was necessary to prevent the spread of "hate speech" and extremist ideologies through online channels. "Individuals and groups influenced by ideologies and deep-seated prejudices in different countries are using internet falsehood to surreptitiously promote their causes, as we have seen in Nigeria with the insurgency of Boko haram," he said.

A clip of Senator Elisha Abbo another vocal supporter of the bill, who is currently under investigation for an alleged assault after being caught on video slapping a woman at a sex shop in July—shows him passionately defending the bill on the floor and condemning what he calls "fake news" from being spread to different countries. "It is a cancer waiting to consume all of us," said Abbo.

A similar bill was proposed back in 2015, but was widely criticized and never passed.

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