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Photo by David Brossard via Flickr/Creative Commons.

Land Expropriation Without Compensation is a Step Closer to Reality in South Africa

South Africans have been reacting on social media to the parliamentary recommendation for amending the constitution.

It's become a dividing line in South African politics and attracted much international attention, but today the Constitutional Review Committee in South Africa's Parliament voted 12-4 to recommend amending the constitution to allow land expropriation without compensation. This recommendation has come after months of public hearings and months of controversy and was supported by the ANC and the National Freedom Party.

President Cyril Ramaphosa informed the European Parliament that the land reforms will be "resolved through adherence to the rule of law and adherence to the constitution," Eyewitness News reports. The Democratic Alliance's counter proposal on the final recommendations was dismissed by the same vote margin, according to IOL.

The report will then be presented to South Africa's National Assembly for debate.

Although the ANC announced the enactment of land reforms a few months ago, OkayAfrica contributor Rufaro Samanga points out that there have been ongoing restitution projects since 1994. What makes this recommendation different in comparison is how the land will be returned without compensation.

"In spite of that, the land must be returned," Samanga says. "And since it was taken from black people without compensation, it stands to reason that it should rightfully be returned to its owners, also without compensation."

South Africans have been sharing thoughts on this new ruling on social media. Here are some of their reactions below.







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Nana Mensah's 'Queen of Glory' To Screen At The 2021 TriBeCa Film Festival

Ghanaian-American actress, writer and filmmaker Nana Mensah talks tenacity in filmmaking and telling immigrant stories from a joyful perspective.

Much has changed in the time since Nana Mensah first had the idea for her directorial feature debut — a dark comedy about a Ghanaian-American scientist trying to reconcile her family heritage in the wake of her mother's death — and began the Kickstarter in 2014 that would help turn it into a film. It may have taken a few years, but the movie Queen of Glory is now showcasing as part of the TriBeCa Film Festival's 20th edition, with a world premiere set to take place at Hudson River Park on June 15th.

When Mensah began working on the film, she was trying to break into an industry that lacked roles for complex, conflicted characters — particularly for Black women. So, she co-founded a production company with her friend Anya Migdal to create those very kinds of projects. She has since forged a solid stage and screen career, with roles in Netflix's Bonding and 13 Reasons Why, as well as NBC's New Amsterdam, and in theatrical productions alongside the likes of Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline and Anthony Mackie. Last year she was in Ekwa Msinga's Farewell Amor, as well as Apple's Anthology series Little America, and she'll soon be seen in Netflix's The Chair with Sandra Oh this summer and Kogonada's upcoming film After Yang, with Colin Farrell. Yet through it all, Mensah has never lost sight of finishing her first film project.

She opens up about what it took to get the film from a mere idea to the TriBeCa Film Festival.

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