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This Convicted Rapist Recited a Bizarre Poem to His Victim in Court

South Africans are angry that Nicholas Ninow was even allowed to recite the poem to his 7-year-old rape victim.

Last year, Nicholas Ninow raped a 7-year-old girl in the bathroom of Dros, a popular South African restaurant franchise in Silverton, Pretoria. Ninow, who has since been dubbed the "Dros Rapist", was working as a waiter at the restaurant and had followed the young girl when she visited the bathroom. News of the young girl's rape rocked the country and caused widespread outrage at a time when there has been a continued surge in rape, femicide and gender-based violence. A month ago, Ninow was found guilty of rape (as well as drug possession and defeating the ends of justice) by Judge Mokhine Mosopa. He will learn of his fate soon as sentencing proceedings begin today. However, Ninow has angered many South Africans after he recited a 48-line poem addressed to his victim as a way to allegedly show his remorse.


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In an effort to reduce what could potentially be a life sentence in jail, Ninow refused to take responsibility for his crime and instead blamed his actions on both his mental health issues and drug abuse. He then went on to recite a poem which he addressed to his victim and her family. Understandably, South Africans are not having it. They feel that Ninow has already been afforded way too many privileges over the course of this case and that being permitted to recite a poem in court is further testament to that.

Towards the end of last year, Ninow was sent to a psychiatric facility to determine whether he would be fit to stand trial. On one hand, you have a justice system that is often accused of protecting rapists and on the other, a man who enjoys the privilege of being a White man. It is unsurprising that South Africans feel that he has been given preferential treatment despite him being a convicted criminal.

Take a look at some of the responses from South Africans on social media:






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