Popular

South Africans Are Angry After Load Shedding Leaves the Country in the Dark

The national power utility, Eskom, has implemented stage-6 load shedding which effectively means it has lost close to half of its generating capacity.

Since last week, South Africans have been experiencing stage 4 load shedding which saw 4000 MW being shed from the national grid in an effort to cope with shortages.

Eskom, the country's embattled state-owned power utility, has recently implemented stage-6 load shedding which is reportedly meant to end today but South Africans are not having it.


Earlier this year in February, Eskom brought back stage-4 load shedding after rampant corruption has left the power utility unable to carry out simple maintenance work on crucial coal-powered stations and in constant need of billion rand bailouts from the government with South Africans having to bear the financial brunt of it. According to energy analyst Chris Yelland who spoke to Fin24, stage-6 load shedding indicates that Eskom has lost 40 percent of its generating capacity—catastrophic in his view.

Naturally, the load shedding has caused a national uproar with South Africans fed up with corrupt government officials, a ruling party which they feel does not prioritize the interests of its citizens and more simply, having to navigate through daily life in the dark.

To make matters worse, President Cyril Ramaphosa left for Egypt shortly after Eskom announced its plans to implement stage 6 load shedding. This drew considerable criticism from South Africans across the board.


John Steenhuisen of the Democratic Alliance (DA), the country's main opposition party, called on Ramaphosa to return home. "The president must come clean on exactly what the structural problems at Eskom are and how his government plans to address them within the coming days. Steenhuisen added that, "There is severe trouble at home, and Ramaphosa must attend to that ahead of all other engagements." EWN reports that Ramaphosa has cut his trip to Egypt short and is now returning to South Africa to address the national power crisis.

Take a look at further reactions from fed-up South Africans below:





Interview

Interview: Bizzle Osikoya Is the A&R Shaping the Voice of a New Generation

We caught up with the A&R expert and co-founder of The Plug Management to talk about the fast-rising demand for Nigerian music and what it takes to break out as an artist.

The meteoric rise of Nigeria's burgeoning music industry over the last few years is definitely one for the books. From high profile collaborations that have graced international charts to appearances on American late night TV and a Grammy nomination, the Nigerian sound is sitting at the epicenter of a global conversation that the world—including Queen Bey herself —seem to scrabbling to get a piece of the action.

However, way before this global infiltration and westernized conflation of Africa's assortment of genres into one Afrobeats, Bizzle Osikoya was studying Music Business in England and plotting for a way to be a part of what he knew was inevitable. "I remember going to clubs in school and they would always play Jamaican music but rarely Nigerian songs. I knew we made good music here but I knew I couldn't sing. So I was motivated to come back, go behind the scenes, and see how we can make that crossover possible," he tells OkayAfrica.

More than a decade after making the intrepid decision to venture into A&R, helping artists find and develop their sound, Bizzle's creative genius has cascaded across different musical generations, from the piracy rife CD mix era with artists like Naeto C, Wande Coal and Dr. Sid to a streaming era populated with hits from Reekado Banks, Tiwa Savage and Davido.

Following the success of his latest project, Oxlade's Oxygene, we caught up with the A&R expert and co-founder of the Plug Management—a talent management company that has managed Davido, Peruzzi and DJ Obi—to talk about what it takes to break out as an artist, the fast-rising demand for Nigerian music, and how "alté" is not the same thing as alternative music.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

In Photos: 'Covid' is Cape Town's New Informal Settlement for Those Displaced by the Pandemic

Cape Town residents whose livelihoods are impacted by the coronavirus pandemic are building new homes in a place they call 'Covid'.