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South Africans Remember Rap Legend HHP a Year After His Death

It's another summer without Jabba.

It's been a year since South Africa lost one of its biggest rap legends in Hip Hop Pantsula (HHP) or Jabba, as he was affectionately known. The 38-year-old, who made a name for himself in the South African hip-hop sub-genre of motswako alongside other heavyweights such as Khuli Chana, Fifi Cooper and Cassper Nyovest, reportedly committed suicide following a long battle with depression. With hits such as "Bosso" and "Music and Lights", HHP was credited with being one of the first artists to fuse kwaito and hip-hop and achieve mainstream success.


READ: HHP, the Ultimate Bosso, Gave Me a Childhood Filled with Feel-Good Jams—Sizom'khumbula

South Africans on social media are paying tribute to HHP and his incredible contribution to the music space. From the country's Minister of Sport, Nathi Mthethwa, his customary wife Lerato Sengadi to fellow musicians DJ Fresh, Solo and Ice Prince (who released the track "A Verse for Jabba"), messages remembering the musician's life have been pouring in.




Following the musician's death, his wife has been in a constant legal battle with his family as it pertains to his estate. It was later discovered, however, that HHP had left everything in his will to his 14-year-old son, Leano Khanye.

Listen to our 12 favorite HHP songs here.
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Photo by Joseph Okpako/WireImage

Wizkid Wins the Inaugural Afrobeats Award at the AMAs

Tems and Wizkid both took home trophies at this year's American Music Awards.


Celebrated Nigerian superstar Ayodeji Ibrahim Balogun, popularly known as Wizkid recently won in the inaugural Favorite Afrobeats Artists category at the 2022 American Music Awards.

The AMAs started its flagship Afrobeats category this year. Other nominees for the award included Burna Boy, CKay, Tems, and Fireboy DML, with Wizkid ultimately taking home the price. Many of the nominated artists had enjoyed massive commercial success in the United States prior to the award show, and the increasing dominance of Afrobeats has made the genre well known in other parts of the world outside of Nigeria.

The "Bad To Me" singer also won the Favorite R&B Song award for the remix to his smash hit "Essence," which featured Tems and Justin Bieber. This was monumental for the night because the song was competing with other hit songs, including Beyonce's "Break My Soul."

Tems also made quite the impression at the award show. In addition to winning an award alongside Wizkkid for the "Essence" remix, she also won in the Favorite Hip Hop Song category for her contribution to Future's "Wait For U," a record that quickly became a fan-favorite with fans for its unique sonic output.

Both Tems and Wizkid have been soaring in their careers following the release of their celebrated song "Essence." Recently, Tems was a co-writer on the Rihanna-led song "Lift Me Up" for the Black Panther: Wakanda Forever sound track. Last week, Wizkid headlined a show at New York City's renowned music venue Madison Square Garden, a major feat for Afrobeats as a whole.

View the complete list of nominees and winners for the award show here.

Music

Watch Fally Ipupa Deliver a Riveting COLORS Performance

The Congolese icon makes his COLORS debut with "Par Terre."


Renowned Congolese singer Fally Ipupa recently released his debut COLORS performance with new song "Par Terre."

Shot against a stark, vivid blue background, the singer serenades his fans by passionately singing in his signature, rhythmic style. The entire performance is indicative of the Ipupa's unique musical spin , which breathes new life into traditional Congolese rumba. The COLORS studio sets Ipupa’s soulful, signature Lingala lyrics against an uplifting, guitar-laden soundscape that is both heartwarming and enjoyable.

Fally Pupa began his career in the late 1990s, as a member of the successful Congolese band Quartier Latin International. Fast forward to 2006, the Kinshasa artist decided to pursue music independently and released his solo debut album, Droit Chemin. The body of work would set the tone for Ipupa to become one of most celebrated and respected artists in Congolese music and Africa as a whole.

He has since gone on to release notable projects that have garnered the respect and admiration of fans and music lovers globally. His unique sound and charisma have also collectively made him one of the most sought-after African artists. Some of his most notable releases include Arsenal de Belles Melodies (2009), Power 'Kosa Leka' (2013), Tokooos (2017), Control (2018), and Tokooos II (2020).

COLORSxSTUDIOS is an intimate music experience that thoroughly showcases exceptional talent from around the globe, and gives fans from different corners of the world a chance to enjoy new music. The COLORS segment focuses on highlighting the distinct talents of various new artists as well as their sounds All COLORS shows seek to provide a poignant, minimalist stage that spotlights the artists and gives them the opportunity to present their music holistically.

Watch Fally Ipupa's memorable, up-close-and-personal COLORS performance below.

Sports

All You Need to Know About the African Teams at the World Cup

We break down how Senegal, Ghana, Cameroon, Morocco, and Tunisia's national teams are looking ahead of the Qatar World Cup 2022.

African football has come a long way.

Egypt was the first African team to ever participate in a FIFA World Cup. They did it in Italy in 1934, where they only played a game, which they lost 4-2 to Hungary. Back then, the Confederation of African Football (CAF) didn’t exist, so the Pharaohs played two qualifier games against British Palestine.

CAF was eventually formed in 1956, but the World Cup would only see another African team in Mexico 1970, when Morocco qualified. Years later, Pelé, the legendary Brazilian player, predicted that an African team would win a World Cup before the year 2000, he was mocked mercilessly. For many, it was not an unlikely outcome, it was an absurd proposition.

And yet, African footballers have become more and more often part of the footballing elite, playing in the best leagues, and becoming some of the most famous players. While, still, only European and South American teams have won World Cups.

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Interview

Seni Saraki On Co-Producing the Nigerian Side of the 'Black Panther' Soundtrack

We speak with NATIVE's Seni Saraki who helped put together the Lagos arm of Black Panther: Wakanda Forever - Music From and Inspired By.

Back in July when Marvel released its Black Panther: Wakanda Forever Prologue EP, led by Tems’ soul-stirring cover of Bob Marley’s “No Woman, No Cry,” the consensus among young, internet-savvy Africans was that the follow-up to 2018’s record-breaking Black Panther was shaping up to be seminal moment for African culture after years of gestation and ascending visibility in the western world.

The arrival of the full soundtrack has proved that the optimism felt at that time was not unfounded. In a sharp contrast to the Kendrick Lamar-curated soundtrack for the first film, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever - Music From and Inspired By is a full-on deep-dive into the pulse of African and Mexican popular music as we know it. Taking influences from these sources makes sense as the movie is primarily inspired by both Nigerian and Meso-american cultures and we get to see acts like Burna Boy, Fireboy DML, DBN Gogo, and CKay line-up on the musical accompaniment to one of the eagerly-anticipated releases of the year.

To get some perspective on how the African arm of the soundtrack came together, we spoke to The NATIVE’s editor-in-chief, Seni Saraki, who served as the soundtrack album co-producer for the Lagos arm of production, touching on his involvement with the project, its reception, and what he hopes its legacy might be.

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