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Struggling Creatives in South Africa's Film & Television Industry to Get Relief

Netflix has teamed up with the South African Screen Federation and Independent Producers Organisation to establish an emergency relief fund for hard-hit South Africans in the film and television space.

News24 reports that Netflix and both the South African Screen Federation (SASFED) and Independent Producers Organisation (IPO) have teamed up to establish an 8 million Rand (approximately 400 000 USD) emergency relief fund that is set to help struggling South African creatives in the local film and television industry. The announcement comes at a time where the livelihoods of many South African creatives have been hard-hit amid the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.

As the world continues to reel from the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, many South African creatives are still struggling to keep their heads above water. The emergency relief fund being collaboratively set up by Netflix, SASFED and the IPO could not have come at a better time.

READ: South Africa's Film and Television Industry Resumes Amid COVID-19 Outbreak

Speaking about the initiative, SASFED Executive Director, Unathi Malunga says the following:

"The Netflix fund supporting the local film industry brings hope to struggling industry professionals. We hope other potential partners will follow Netflix's example and support SASFED's broader initiatives which offer assistance to industry professionals across the whole value chain - an initiative undertaken by industry, for the industry. SASFED applauds Netflix' support of the local screen sector during the global crisis."

Netflix's lead for African Originals, Dorothy Ghettuba, echoed Malunga's sentiments saying, "South African crews are vital to Netflix's success and we want to help those freelancers who most need support in these unprecedented times."

This recent announcement comes after Netflix announced in March of this year that it would be setting aside a 100 million USD relief fund for the global creative industry. Music streaming platform Apple Music also launched the "Stream Local" initiative to support South African artists earlier this year.

South African artists have also called for both the SABC and Minister of Arts and Culture, Nathi Mthethwa, to do more to address their financial struggles during this precarious time.

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Photo courtesy of AYLØ.

Interview: AYLØ Bridges His Music & Universe In the 'Clairsentience' EP

The Nigerian artist talks about trusting your gut feelings, remedying imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do.

AYLØ's evolution as an artist has led him to view sensitivity as a gift. As the alté soundscape in the Nigerian scene gains significant traction, his laser focus cuts through the tempting smokescreen of commercial success. AYLØ doesn't make music out of need or habit. It all boils down to the power of feeling. "I know how I can inspire people when I make music, and how music inspires me. Now it's more about the message."

Clairsentience, the title of the Nigerian artist's latest EP, is simply defined as the ability to perceive things clearly. A clairsentient person perceives the world through their emotions. Contrary to popular belief, clairsentience isn't a paranormal sixth sense reserved for the chosen few, our inner child reveals that it's an innate faculty that lives within us before the world told us who to be.

Born in 1994 in Benin City, Nigeria, AYLØ knew he wanted to be a musician since he was six-years-old. Raised against the colorful backdrop of his dad's jazz records and the echoes of church choirs from his mother's vast gospel collections, making music isn't something anyone pushed him towards, it organically came to be. By revisiting his past to reconcile his promising future, he shares that, "Music is about your experiences. You have to live to write shit. Everything adds up to the music."

Our conversation emphasized the importance of trusting your gut feelings, how to remedy imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do,

This interview has been edited for purposes of brevity and clarity.

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Bobi Wine and His Wife Released from House Arrest

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