News Brief

Here's a 1970s Sudanese Jazz Track From Kamal Keila

These revivals of the "James Brown or Fela Kuti of Sudan's" tracks are giving us life.

"Taban Ahwak," is yet another funky, jazzy, Sudanese-sound inspired track from Kamal Keila that must be heard.

Habibi Funk Records is re-releasing another jewel from Kamal Keila's album, Muslims and Christians, and we're excited to be premiering it here for you to revel in with us.


Keila never failed to harmoniously incorporate Eritrean, Ethiopian, Shilluk, Dinka, South Sudan and South Kordofan beats and melodies in his music, making his records timeless, multi-diverse journeys through Africa.

Keila is also a mastermind in exploring the history of Sudan and its political crisis dating all the way back from the 60s and beyond. Part of the thrill in listening to his music is knowing that Keila's method of switching between singing in Arabic and English on his tracks was his tactic as an activist.

As Sudanese-British journalist, Yousra Elbagir put it:

"He [Keila] believes that artistic expression is more than entertainment and should be driven by a message. The messages he chose to underpin his songs would turn out to be the biggest social and political issues Sudan would come to face. Knowing that his political messages could inevitably land him in jail, Keila sang his most controversial songs in English so that they would y under the radar of the Arab-aligned regime."

You will be able to obtain the track, "Taban Ahwak," and Keila's full album, Muslims and Christians on July 6th via Habibi Funk, now available to pre-order.

In the meantime, enjoy the premiere of the full track, "Taban Ahwak" below.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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