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This 1970s Sudanese Jazz Album Will Revive You

The music of Kamal Keila, known as "the James Brown or Fela Kuti of Sudan," gets re-released.

Kamal Keila's new album, "Muslims & Christians" is a pleasant, welcomed dream presented in the unique form of Sudanese jazz.

Released by Habibi Funk Records, Keila's album promotes the unity of a people who, for decades, have been led apart by completely different beliefs, while reciting the political history of Sudan at the same time. Once you get past its funky, soulful beats, you'll be uplifted by the message behind them.


The idea to release Kamal Keila's tracks was inspired by Habibi Funk's want to incite a grander musical experience that would touch the listener beyond the notes. The label's discussion with Sudanese artist, Sharhabeel, about re-releasing some of his old music turned into a personal discovery of Sudanese culture and music.

Habibi Funk's learning and traveling endeavors with blogger and Sudanese jazz & IT expert, Yassir Awad, led to the spark of the re-release of "the James Brown or Fela Kuti of Sudan," Kamal Keila's great music.

Kamal Keila's album is a time capsule of Sudan's history dating all the way back to the 1970s. It features Ethiopian, Sudanese jazz, funk, blues and soul sounds that compliment powerful lyrics. Keila is transparent in each track as he calls for peace between Muslims and Christians, and weeps for the inevitable fate of the "Shmasha," war orphans.

Let your day be made by Kamal Keila's album, Muslims & Christians, which you can find below.

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10 African Films That Deal With Protest Culture & History

African countries have a long history of protests and demonstrations against forces of oppression, and this has been represented significantly in cinema.

Around the world, Nigerians in the diaspora have picked up the mantle of protesting peacefully against police brutality and violence. These gatherings are a direct extension of the nationwide protests that were brought to a tragic halt in Lagos after soldiers of the Nigerian army fired guns at peaceful protesters at the Lekki tollgate venue.

African countries have a long history of protests and demonstrations against forces of oppression and this has been represented significantly in cinema. This list, while not an exhaustive one, attempts to contextualize this rich cinematic history, tracing the complex and diverse ways that protest culture have been reflected in African film. From influential classics that are now considered required viewing to fascinating portraits of individual resistance, these films are proof that the struggle continues, regardless.

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