News Brief
Photo by Ahmed Mustafa for AFP/Getty Images.

Photo by Ahmed Mustafa for AFP/Getty Images.

Sudanese Security Forces Have Attempted to Disperse Protesters in Khartoum

At least 13 people have been reported killed after security forces opened fire at the protest camp.

Sudanese security forces have attempted to disperse the long-standing protest in the country's capital Monday by opening fire on protesters, Reuters reports.

At least 13 people have been reported killed with over 116 wounded in Khartoum—making this the worst violence since President Omar al-Bashir was pushed out of power in April.

Sudanese dissidents on the ground have utilized social media to share images and video footage of people fleeing and rushing to carry protesters who have been hit by gunfire.



Reports from witnesses say the sit-in that was positioned next to the Defense Ministry—a key location of the protests—has cleared, but protesters continue to take space elsewhere in Khartoum in response to backlash.

Despite the Sudanese Professionals Association calling the action a "massacre," the military council has denied trying to disperse the camp, saying security forces were targeting "unruly" groups. The association has called its fellow citizens to take part in "total civil disobedience" to topple the military council, AFP reports. The Alliance for Freedom and Change has called for "the end of all political contact and negotiations with the putschist Council" following the incident, as Egypt has appealed for the two sides to continue to negotiate.

Irfan Siddiq, Britain's ambassador to Khartoum, condemned the attack, calling it "an outrageous step."

Music
(Youtube)

9 Must-Hear Songs From Ghana's Buzzing Drill Scene

We give you the rundown on Ghana's drill movement, Asakaa, and the most popular songs birthed by it.

Red bandanas, streetwear, security dogs, and gang signs. If you've been paying any attention to the music scene in Ghana over the past few months, then by now you would have noticed the rise of a special hip-hop movement. The movement is called Asakaa, and it's the Ghanaian take on the Chicago-born subgenre of hip-hop called drill music. It's fresh, it's hot, it's invigorating and it's nothing like anything you've seen before from this part of the world.

The pioneers of Asakaa are fondly referred to by the genre's patrons as the Kumerica boys, a set of budding young rappers based in the city of Kumasi in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. They came into the limelight towards the end of 2020, and have been dropping banger after banger since then, topping several charts and racking up millions of views collectively. The rap is charismatic, the visuals are captivating, and their swag is urban. Characterized by Twi lyrics, infectious hooks, and sinister beats, the allure and appeal of both their art and their culture is overflowing.

"Sore," one of the benchmark songs of the movement, is a monster hit that exploded into the limelight, earning Kumerican rapper Yaw Tog a feature on Billboard Italy and a recent remix that featured Stormzy. "Ekorso" by Kofi Jamar is the song that took over Ghana's December 2020, with the video currently sitting at 1.3 million views on YouTube. "Off White Flow" is the song that earned rapper Kwaku DMC and his peers a feature on Virgil Abloh's Apple Music show Televised Radio. These are just a few examples of the numerous accolades that the songs birthed from the Asakaa movement have earned. Ghana's drill scene is the new cool, but it isn't just a trend. It's an entire movement, and it's here to stay.

Want to get familiar? Here we highlight the most prominent songs of the Asakaa movement that you need to know. Here's our rundown of Ghana's drill songs that are making waves right now. Check them out below.

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