Events

Swaziland: The 2012 Bushfire Festival

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The 6th annual Swaziland Bushfire Festival begins on Friday and runs through the weekend (May 25-27). By this time of year, the weather can be pretty cool in Swaziland, but 20,000 people are expected to heat up the Ezulwini Valley over the three days. 100% of the festival profits go to NGOs in Swaziland that support the small nation's tremendous HIV burden. Family-friendly, with camping and lodge accomodations in the area, Bushfire is a mix of the region, with larger-than-life Giant Puppets of Mozambique, South African plays like "Woza Albert" and festival goers from Botswana and beyond. Music, poetry, and art gathered from around the world. Throughout the year, Bushfire's venue, House on Fire, is host to musical acts from around the world and is also a permanent art studio. Three Okayafrica contributors will be covering the weekends' highlights (watch scenes from last year's festival above).

Lineup: Ayo, Saul Williams and Band, Jeremy Loops, MXO feat. Joe Nina, Adam Glasser's 'Msanzi' Feat. Pinise Saul and Bheki Khoza, Nancy G and the Human Family, Tonik, The Silent Conductor, Bholoja feat. Velemseni, Revolution, Mi Casa, Tsepo Tshola, The Brother Moves On, Mango Groove, Napalma, Sakaki Mango and Limba Train Sound Systme, Ras Haitrm, Labahambako in Transit and Claiming Grounds, Jika Nelanga, Nicky B, Monotone, Joey Rasdien, DJ Lila, Swazi DJs.

Information on tickets and accommodations is available on the festival website.

 

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

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