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Image via Wikimedia

Google Honors Nigerian Feminist Icon, Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti, With Doodle

Today would have been the Nigerian trailblazer's 119th birthday.

Pay your Google Doodle extra attention today. It is honoring Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti, an activist, teacher and politician, on her birthday. She would have been 119 today. Ransome-Kuti became a prominent Nigerian icon as she fought for women's rights, including women's right to vote, and was constantly breaking barriers—including being the first woman in Nigeria to drive a car and ride a motorcycle. Her work earned her two beloved monikers: "The Lioness of Lisabi" and "The Mother of Africa." If that wasn't enough, she's also Fela Kuti's mom.

The doodle, illustrated by Nigerian-Italian artist Diana Ejaita, blends Ransome-Kuti's accomplishments into Google's logo and show her actions reflected in women who bear her likeness. The artist is known for using stark blacks and soft colors to show the "strength of femininity," perfect in a portrait of Ransome-Kuti. If you can't view the doodle automatically, that is because it will only show up for searches in Nigeria. But, don't worry, check it out via Google Doodle's twitter post below.

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OkayAfrica's 100 Women

In Photos: This Is What OkayAfrica 100 Women's First Gathering of the Month Looked Like

OkayAfrica 100 Women 2019 honorees Clemantine Wamariya, Soull and Dynasty Ogun along with curator Neema Githere imparted fulfilling words on personal storytelling in a panel discussion at Okay Space.

We've hit the ground running celebrating our third iteration of this year's fabulous OkayAfrica 100 Women honorees and Sunday marked our first auxiliary event of the month, bringing the sentiments and purpose of the list to life.

Peeling Back: The Art and Origin of Personal Storytelling was a panel discussion moderated by 2019 honoree and author Clemantine Wamariya. In conversation with curator Neema Githere (replacing honoree Laylah Amatullah Barrayn, who unfortunately couldn't attend due to illness) and fellow honorees Soull and Dynasty Ogun of L'Enchanteur, the women shared with an intimate gathering of supporters in Okay Space their own origin stories, how their stories are ever-evolving and how their anchor and surround themselves with the people—past and present—who are interwoven with their stories too.

Throughout the month of March there will be more opportunities to gather in community to amplify and uplift the 2019 honorees (and each other). Keep tabs on the events page via the OkayAfrica 100 Women website here—and don't forget to RSVP for updates.

Take a look at images from the gathering, with images by Nerdscarf Photography, below.

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