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Watch Bernadine Evaristo Talk About Womanhood and Othering on 'BBC: Focus on Africa'

The 2019 Booker Prize winner speaks to BBC about her acclaimed book 'Girl, Woman, Other'.

Earlier this week, British-Nigerian author Bernadine Evaristo was awarded the prestigious Booker Prize for her book, Girl, Woman, Other. Although the Booker Prize forbids that the award be given to more than one individual, the committee reportedly felt that two novels were deserving of this year's prize. While Evaristo made history as the first ever Black woman to win the prize, many were not pleased that she had to share the prize with Canadian author, Margaret Atwood. Recently, in an interview with BBC: Focus on Africa, Evaristo spoke about womanhood, othering in terms of race, sexuality, class and immigration status.

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Boity and Dee Koala Totally Own ‘Utatakho Remix’

Boity and Dee Koala deliver great verses on "Utatakho Remix."

One of the most anticipated songs of the year was the remix to "Utatakho" by Yanga Chief. It's the combination of rappers enlisted on the song and of course the fact that the original is a heater that raised everyone's curiosity.

Riky Rick takes the opening verse, and drops decent bars, but things start taking a different turn from Dee Koala's verse. The Cape Town emcee frolics over the beat, switching flows, aligning her bars perfectly with the instrumental. She shows love to her city and reminds you she's great.

In her verse, Boity opens about her personal issues with her father: "Personally, this is a touchy subject/ 'Cause my dad was live but his presence wasn't/ So my mama was everything daddy wasn't," and goes on to say she holds no grudge towards her father, and refusing to dwell on that, she chooses to be grateful for her present life.

One thing is clear, Boity can rap. Her verse on this remix is seamlessly delivered in both English and Setswana. Every word she utters sounds believable. She has been consistently dope since she released her first song last year, "Wuz Dat."

"Utatakho Remix" is the closing song on Yanga Chief's recently released EP Becoming a Pop Star. The nine-track project includes the original version of "Utatakho" and the song "200," which was released last week. Apart from the guests on the remix, features on BAPS include AKA and Makwa.

Listen to Becoming a Pop Star below:



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Still taken from YouTube.

Watch this Stunning South African Documentary Film 'Womanhood'

South African women from different walks of life speak about their experiences of womanhood through various lenses.

Womanhood is a short documentary film which is the result of a collaboration between South African insurer 1st For Women and digital media platform Vice. The short documentary features an array of South African women from different and diverse backgrounds speaking about what womanhood means to them. The documentary itself focuses on five important themes: freedom, body, pain, motherhood and future.

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Illustration by Simone Martin-Newberry

A 15-Year-Old Nigerian Student Lends Her Voice to the Fight Against Boko Haram With Graphic Novel

Aisha Mustapha's graphic novel about her experiences under Boko Haram was published today for International Day of the Girl.

Aisha Mustapha, is a 15-year-old student from Nigeria, using her voice to tell her own story. The young writer recently penned a graphic novel about her experience fleeing Boko Haram, locating her family and trying to further her education. It's a heavy subject, obviously, but with her graphic novel, she offers a voice for young people directly affected by the crisis in Northern Nigeria.

The book was published today to mark the International Day of the Girl, a day established by the United Nations in 2011 to "highlight and address the needs and challenges girls face, while promoting girls' empowerment and the fulfillment of their human rights."

Aisha's talent for storytelling has previously been highlighted in Assembly, a by-girls-for-girls publication by the Malala Fund that brought Aisha's graphic novel to life, premiering it today in conjunction with International Day of the GIrl. Tess Thomas, Assembly's editor, elaborated on the purpose of the publication saying, "We believe in the power of girls' voices to generate change. Our publication provides girls with a platform so their opinions and experiences can inform decisions about their futures."

Aisha's words were illustrated by artist Simone Martin-Newberry, who had this to say about the process of creating the visuals for the graphic novel: "I was very moved by Aisha's story, and really wanted to treat it sensitively and do it justice with my illustrations. My aim was to capture the real emotions and actions of the story, but also keep my artwork bright and colorful and full of pattern, to help reflect Aisha's amazing youthful spirit."

Check out some excerpts from the piece below and head here to read it in full.
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