News Brief
Photo courtesy of the TEF.

The TEF Entrepreneurship Forum Will Be the Largest Gathering of African Entrepreneurs In the World

Over 1,300 African entrepreneurs, business leaders and policymakers are attending the 3rd Tony Elumelu Foundation Entrepreneurship Forum in Lagos this week.

This weekend, the most inclusive gathering of African experts in business, entrepreneurship and policy will descend to Lagos, Nigeria to attend the Tony Elumelu Foundation Entrepreneurship Forum from October 13 to October 14.


In it's third year, Africa's largest philanthropy focused on supporting entrepreneurship will open the forum to non-TEF entrepreneurs and will allow subject matter experts from across the continent to attend, network, connect with investors and share knowledge.

"Since launching the TEF Entrepreneurship Programme – and committing $100 million to empowering 10,000 African entrepreneurs in a decade – we have unleashed our continent's most potent development force – its entrepreneurs," Tony O. Elumelu, founder of TEF, says in a press release. "In just 3 years, our 3,000 entrepreneurs have created tens of thousands of jobs and generated considerable wealth. On October 13 and 14, we invite the global entrepreneurship community to Lagos toward the realization of a New Africa, a thriving, self-reliant continent capable of replicating the results we have seen in our ground-breaking programme."

Featuring speakers including Wale Ayeni of the International Finance Coporation, Stephen Tio Kauma of Afrexim Bank, Abdoulaye Mar Dieye of the UNDP, the two-day event will be full of plenary panels, masterclasses and sector specific networking opportunities focused on improving the enabling environment of African businesses.

Elumelu's long-term investment through his foundation in empowering African entrepreneurs is indicative of his "Africapitalism" philosophy—which positions Africa's private sector and it's entrepreneurs as the innovators for social and economic development of the continent.

You can tune in and livestream the forum—check this link once it begins this Friday.

Be sure to keep up with the event using the hashtag #TEFforum2017 on Twitter and Facebook, as well as their website.

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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