Style

The Influencer's Insight: Kamo Mafokwane Is the South African Content Creator Pushing Brands To Value Influencers

The final feature in our four-part series highlights Kamo Mafokwane—the South African fashion and beauty blogger who's steadfast in developing her craft.

"The Influencer's Insight" is our four-part series for April's theme "The Hustle." The series features women content creators who've achieved influencer status through their social media platforms. These influencers will give their insight on how they built their brand, challenges they've faced, influencer marketing tips and more.

The final part of the series features Kamo Mafokwane of fashion and beauty blog, WILLKATE. ICYMI, read part three here.


WILLKATE's Kamogelo Mafokwane is the content creator offering her perspective on luxury fashion and beauty. The London in which she resides provides her with daily inspiration. From street style to art and from design to architecture, the city serves as a melting pot that serves as the perfect backdrop for creativity. The South Africa she calls home is notorious for its vibrant and bold flair. The merging of the two allows for content that is widely popular. "Inspiration lies everywhere and anywhere," Mafokwane says. "It's in the small things like an interesting color or texture in a vegetable in the grocery store."

WILLKATE began as a spontaneous passion project in 2013 during her first year at London's College of Fashion, where she pursued a bachelors in creative direction. With every year that passed, her "hobby" became more and more serious. Presently, she's graduated and dedicates all her time to her ever-growing brand. She's even expanded into the realms of travel, interior decor and lifestyle. Her hands in many pots helps to halt creative blocks.

Photo courtesy of Kamo Mafokwane.

Contrary to popular belief, the introvert says her job isn't as glamorous as it seems. Where some weekdays are comprised of meetings, sourcing clothes for shoots, and running into coffee shops to change, 98 percent of her time is spent in no makeup and sweats editing and responding to emails. Her dedication to her craft hasn't gone unnoticed. Mafokwane's clean and crisp aesthetic has landed her work with Cartier, Wolford, Topshop, and IWC Schaffhausen. Making great content, however, is "in you. Creativity can't be forced. You have to put time and effort in versus just posting," she says.

When speaking with Mafokwane, it's evident she has unwavering faith and knowledge of self. She states, "God has gotten me where I am." All her mornings start with prayer and she is guided by her blog's namesakes, her late father and grandmother. She prefers working with women because "they understand me easier." She's driven and weaves stories for brands using both her instinct and heart. "On stage in front of 1,000 people," she'll do great but, "at someone's intimate gathering with strangers," she won't say a word.

The content creator flourishes in an industry where, "Brands don't [always] value [blogger] influence."

Photo courtesy of Kamo Mafokwane.

"One business model does not apply to each blogger," she continues. "Influence is not just about number of followers. Brands should look into engagement." Despite companies adhering to spending undisclosed amounts, "Time, work, and quality goes into the work we produce so we have to be selective," she says. Mafokwane has her sights set on Dior and FWRD—and there's no doubt in our minds she will conquer these brands and more.

Here are three more lessons Kamo Mafokwane has taken away from her journey as a content creator:

  1. You don't have to be friends with everyone: "It's ok if everyone doesn't support, you will get where you need to get to eventually."
  2. You don't have to share with everyone: "When telling your friends and family about your work, it can seem like you are bragging. I don't discuss it with them."
  3. Learn to say no: "Don't compromise your morals and values for a paycheck or to work with a brand."

Audrey Lang is an alumna of Northeastern University and a Boston-based site merchandiser. A surveyor of life who's enamored with all things fashion, art and Africa, keep up with her on Instagram and Tumblr.

News Brief
Photo: Getty

Here's What You Need To Know About The Political Unrest In Sudan

Thousands have been protesting the Sudanese government over the weekend, supporting the military's plans for a coup.

Sudan's transitional government is in turmoil as thousands of citizens conducted a sit-in protest against them, over the weekend. A group of Sudanese citizens have called on the military to disestablish the nation's current government, as the country struggles with the greatest crisis they've seen since the end of former dictator Omar al-Bashir's controversial ruling, two years ago. The weekend's pro-military protests come as anti-military protestors took to the streets earlier this month to fight for civilian-ruled laws.

Military-aligned demonstrators assembled outside of the famously off-limits entrance of the Presidential Palace located in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum on Monday. Gatherers set up tents, blocking off access to two main intersections, cutting off access to the capital for those inside. Police attempted to wave off crowds with teargas, with Khartoum state officials saying they had, "repelled an attempted assault on the seat of government," in a statement issued Monday.

The assembly was called for by a coalition of rebel groups and political parties that support Sudan's military, accusing the civilian political parties of mismanagement and monopolizing power under their ruling. Demonstrations began on Saturday, but Sunday's gathering saw a lower attendance. According to Reuters, by Monday afternoon, thousands, between 2,000 - 3,000, had returned to voice their concerns. 52-year-old tribal elder Tahar Fadl al-Mawla spoke at the helm of the sit-in outside of the Presidential palace saying, "The civilian government has failed. We want a government of soldiers to protect the transition." Alongside a 65-year-old Ahman Jumaa who claimed to have traveled more than 900 kilometers (570 miles) from Southern region Nyala to show his support.

Protesters are demanding the appointment of a new cabinet that is "more representative of the people who participated in the December 2019 revolution that eventually led to the ousting of former president Omar al-Bashir", Al Jazeera reported from Sudan. Protesters headed towards the Presidential Palace, where an emergency cabinet meeting was being held when they were met by police forces.

Pro-civilian political parties have plans for their own demonstration on Thursday, the anniversary of the 1964 revolution that overthrew Sudan's first military regime under Ibrahim Abboud and brought in a period of democracy that the country still struggles to uphold.


Sudanese Twitter users shared their thoughts online, with many drawing similarities between the current unrest and other political crises the nation has faced.


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