News Brief

Black Girls Are Going Missing In D.C.—What You Need to Know

The issue of missing black and Latino teens in the nation's capital has remained largely below the radar until now.

With nearly a dozen black teens reported missing in Washington D.C. this week alone, representatives in the country's capital are calling on the FBI to investigate what appears to be an upsurge in the number of black and Latino teenagers that have been gone missing in the area this year.


Lawmakers have asked Attorney General Jeff Sessions and FBI Director James Comey to step in and "devote the resources necessary to determine whether these developments are an anomaly or whether they are indicative of an underlying trend that must be addressed.”

According to Rachel Reid, the spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police, this has been an ongoing problem in the region for the past couple of years,  the real increase is in the amount of social media coverage on the issue. "We've just been posting them on social media more often," she said.  The police department's numbers show that the amount of teens who have gone missing actually dropped from 2,433 in 2015 to 2,242 in 2016, reports NBC's Washington local news.

It's becoming clear, that cases involving black and Latino teens, in particular, lack sufficient media coverage. According to the Black and Missing foundation 36.8 percent of missing children in America are black.

“We also noticed that a lot of African American children that go missing are initially classified as runaways," says Natalie Wilson, the organization's co-founder. "They do not get an Amber Alert or media coverage."

This lack of national attention is what has many outraged across social media, as many wonder why this pervasive issue has gone under the radar until now.

While social media definitely aids in helping call attention to such issues, if we learned anything from the 2014 #BringBackOurGirls movement, sadly, it's that hashtag activism alone, is not enough to bring our girls home.

 

 

 

Interview

Adekunle Gold Is Living His Best Life

We speak to the Nigerian star about how marriage and fatherhood have led him to find both newfound happiness and newfound freedom as an artist.

''I'm having the time of my life,'' says Adekunle Gold over a Zoom call while seated in his office in Lagos. ''I'm making songs that are so true to my current energy, my current vibe.'' When I got on the call with the 34-year-old artist on a Wednesday afternoon, the first thing I noticed was his hair tied up in little braids, the second was his wide smile. As we speak, the crooner laughs multiple times but it's his aura that shines through the computer screen, it lets you know better than his words that he's truly having the time of life.

Born Adekunle Kosoko, the popular Nigerian singer got married barely two years ago to fellow artist Simi. Last year, the power couple welcomed their first child. As we talk, Gold points to his journey as a father and a husband as some of the biggest inspirations at the moment not just as far as music goes but as his perspective in life and how he now approaches things.

''My [artistry] has changed a lot because being a father and being a husband has made me grow a lot and more.'' Adekunle Gold tells OkayAfrica. ''It has made me understand life a lot more too. I'm feeling more responsible for people. You know, now I have a kid to raise and I have a wife to support, to be a real man and husband and father for.'' He credits this journey with both his newfound happiness and a newfound freedom as an artist.

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