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'Diaspora Dialogues' Is a New Series Connecting People of African Descent Globally

The new show from Koshie Mills is encouraging open discussion between Africans and members of the Diaspora.

Ghanaian media personality, Koshie Mills, is launching a new conversation series that will foster and encourage discussion between Africans and members of the diaspora, entitled "Diaspora Dialogues."


Here's a summary of the show via Shadow and Act:

"[Diaspora Dialogues] are a series of innovative, inspirational, entertaining and intimate conversations designed to facilitate cultural exchange, while fostering and inspiring empathy between two seemingly different groups of the same people, Africa and its Diaspora,"

Mills, who is also the mother of actor Kofi Siriboe, is both the creator and executive producer of the show. She says that her aim with the series, is to forge connections between the continent and the diaspora and provide a platform for nuanced perspectives.

"Impacting the continent in a positive way is my biggest intention. We will challenge the prior narratives and stereotypes about Africa by driving the conversation about us and creating a desire for the global descendants of the continent to connect with the motherland."

The show will feature a bevy of guests including social media influencers, actors, and musicians including, Estelle, Khoudia Diop also known as the Melanin Goddess, Chiké Okonkwo of Being Mary Jane, and a slew of other notable folks.

Check out the trailer below to learn more about the series.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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