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More Bras And Undies Sent To Africa

Reassessing a social enterprise project that aims to re-sell donated garments in Tanzania.


So according to Wikipedia, since the 14th century women in the West have used a variety of garments to cover, restrain, or modify the appearance of breasts. We'll take their word for it.

Fast forward to the 21st century, and now women in the West (AustraliaGreat Britain) want to give their bras away to help impoverished women in Africa.

Fast forward to today and two British students are heading to Tanzania for a social enterprise project to re-sell donated garments. No shade for social enterprise, but looking at the pictures of Scott Row and Emma Woodhall (below), we feel like this needs another side eye.

When Oxfam launched a similar initiative this past April there was uproar, but the debate showed that there's not a consensus on whether this type of development work is appropriate. We think for us it is not. Again social enterprise plays an important role in economic development, but there's something very crude about used personal garments. It probably has to do with the privacy we associate with body parts such as the breasts, and that combined with the dynamics of how the West engages with Africa. We're all for recycling and coming up with creative ways to encourage economic activity- but we think this particular project needs a bit more innovation, and to pause on the bras.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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