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Get your daily fix of what's hot on the continent and the diaspora, May 9.

DIASPORA—Nigerian visual artist Victor Ehikhamenor, has called out controversial, British artist, Damien Hirst for replicating traditional Ife sculpture in his latest exhibition, “Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable,” without making any reference to Nigeria or Ife.


Ehikhamenor is currently representing Nigeria at the Venice Biennial, where he’s presenting his Benin-inspired collection “Biography of the Forgotten.” Upon coming across Hirst’s recreation, he took to Instagram to point out the artist’s lack of acknowledgement of the source of his design.

“For the thousands of viewers seeing this for the first time, they won't think Ife, they won't think Nigeria,” wrote Ehikhamenor. “Their young ones will grow up to know this work as Damien Hirst's. As time passes it will pass for a Damien Hirst regardless of his small print caption. The narrative will shift and the young Ife or Nigerian contemporary artist will someday be told by a long-nose critic ‘your work reminds me of Damien Hirst's Golden Head.’ We need more biographers for our forgotten."

Hirst has yet to respond. Read more via Pulse Nigeria.

The British are back for more from 1897 to 2017. The Oni of Ife must hear this. "Golden heads (Female)" by Damien Hirst currently part of his Venice show "Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable" at Palazzo Grassi. For the thousands of viewers seeing this for the first time, they won't think Ife, they won't think Nigeria. Their young ones will grow up to know this work as Damien Hirst's. As time passes it will pass for a Damien Hirst regardless of his small print caption. The narrative will shift and the young Ife or Nigerian contemporary artist will someday be told by a long nose critic "Your work reminds me of Damien Hirst's Golden Head". We need more biographers for our forgotten. #ifesculptures #classicnigerianart #workbynigerianartist #ifenigeria #lestweforget #nigeria #abiographyoftheforgotten

A post shared by Victor Ehikhamenor (@victorsozaboy) on

DIASPORA—The Somali community in Minneapolis, Minnesota is currently facing a measles outbreak, which began in April. The recent outbreak has been largely fueled by anti-vaccine groups within the city, who’ve targeted Somali parents and convinced them not to vaccinate their children. There have been 44 cases reported so far. Read more about how vaccine-deniers continue to spread unscientific medical information that’s putting Somali-American children at risk.

DIASPORA—Nigerian afrobeats heavyweight, Davido, has welcomed his second child, Hailey, with his girlfriend, Amanda, who gave birth to the baby girl on Tuesday. The musician shared some snaps with followers from the delivery room. Check them out via Ynaija.com.

SOUTH AFRICA—A ban that prevented South Africa from hosting sporting events—due to its underrepresentation of black players in a range of athletics—has been lifted. The county is vying to host the 2023 Rugby World Cup. "This is great news and a tribute to the work that the sport has been doing in recent years to stay in tune and relevant to modern South Africa," said the country’s rugby president, Mark Alexander. Read the full story via BBC Africa.

DIASPORA—Ghanaian soccer star Sulley Muntari, says he’s ready to start a boycott in response to the rampant racial abuse he faces at the hands of European soccer fans. "I couldn't take it anymore, I’m human,” Muntari told CNN Sport.

"This isn't the first time it has happened. We talk about it and after maybe one week, two weeks, it's gone. Then, maybe after a month or two later, it happens somewhere and you get calls to talk about it and then it's shut again."

Read the full story, and check out a clip from Muntari's interview with CNN below.

Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

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