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'They Will Have To Kill Us First' Malian Music Documentary Opens In Theaters March 4

Okayafrica is an executive producer of the Malian music documentary 'They Will Have To Kill Us First,' opening in theaters March 4.

Songhoy Blues. Courtesy of They Will Have To Kill Us First


ICYMI, Okayafrica is an executive producer on They Will Have To Kill Us First: Malian Music In Exile. Opening in theaters March 4, the Johanna Schwartz-directed feature-length documentary follows a group of musicians in Mali–recent breakout stars Songhoy Blues along with musicians Khaira Arby, Moussa Sidi and Fadimata “Disco” Walet Oumar–in the wake of the 2012 jihadist takeover and subsequent banning of music.

The film is being released this March and April in the U.S. by BBC Worldwide North America. It officially debuts in theaters on March 4 (the day after Music Freedom Day) at New York City's Village East Cinema, before heading to L.A. and other markets on April 1.

A soundtrack for the film is also out March 4 on Knitting Factory Records. Composed by Nick Zinner of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, the OST features contributions by Songhoy Blues, the late Malian legend Ali Farka Touré and his son Vieux Farka Touré, Toumani Diabaté, Bombino and more.

For more information on the film, head here.

Get your tickets to see They Will Have To Kill Us First, in theaters March 4 at Village East Cinema in NYC.

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Six Things History Will Remember Kenneth Kaunda For

News of Kenneth David Kaunda's passing, at age 97, has reverberated across the globe. Kaunda, affectionately known as KK, was Zambia's first President from 1964 to 1991.

Following Nelson Mandela's passing in December 2013, Kenneth Kaunda became Africa's last standing hero. Now with his passing on Thursday, June 17 — after being admitted to the Maina Soko Military Hospital in Lusaka earlier in the week — this signals the end of Africa's liberation history chapter.

It is tempting to make saints out of the departed. The former Zambian struggle hero did many great things. He was, after all, one of the giants of the continent's struggle against colonialism. Ultimately however, he was a human being. And as with all humans, he lived a complicated and colourful life.

Here are six facts you might not have known about him.

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