News Brief

This Professor Is Being Detained In Cameroon for Criticizing the Government's Response to the Anglophone Crisis

The international community speaks out following the illegal detainment of Stony Brook professor, Patrice Nganang, in Yaoundé last Wednesday.

Several educators, humanitarians, NGOs, concerned citizens and more have signed an open letter, condemning the detainment of Cameroonian-American educator, writer and activist Patrice Nganang last Wednesday in Yaoundé, and asking for his immediate release.

The associate professor of literary and cultural theory at Stony Brook University, is currently being illegally held by the Cameroonian government after publishing an essay, critical of President Paul Biya and his administration's handling of the Anglophone protest movement, according to a statement from Stony Brook President Samuel L. Stanley Jr.

"Authorities are working around the clock with the appropriate authorities and elected U.S. representatives to help facilitate the safe return of Professor Nganang," says President Stanley Jr.

Born in Yaoundé, Nganang holds American citizenship and has authored several award-winning works.

"We join the Cameroon People's Party, PEN USA, Amnesty International, the African Literature Association, Human Rights Watch, Committee to Protect Journalists, and other friends of freedom of expression in calling for the immediate release of Professor Nganang," reads the open letter.

Many on social media are also joining in the movement to get Nganang released, and are using the opportunity to call out rampant censorship in the nation, and suppression of freedom of speech. Since the crisis began earlier this year, the internet in predominantly Anglophone regions has been blocked twice and several have been killed in government crackdowns.

Nganang is currently awaiting a hearing for three separate charges, a Facebook page has been created in support of the mission to free him.


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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

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