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This Video Challenges You to "Get it Back"​

Throw off the constraints of western culture and embrace the richness of African tradition.

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Everyday we scour the continent for the latest in music and culture from African artists. And while style and innovation are in abundance, African creators are often overshadowed by their western counterparts. European language, culture and beauty still dominates African life both on the continent and abroad. Despite our rich traditions, African cultures are seen as second rate, something to be shed in favor of those of the west. With globalisation and international media intent on erasing what makes a place unique, it's up to us to stand up for what's ours.


In this powerful and poetic new video, a young man painted in western flags stands resolute but burdened looking down on his city until he falls, plunging into a deep pool of water representing a rebirth into African consciousness. Suddenly we see him as a young man, running through an unfinished building. Images of African pride set distinctly in a raw urban geography flash through his mind's eye. It tells the viewer that to be African and a city dweller is not a contradiction but something to be celebrated and cherished. This, too, is Africa.

Africanness it says, does not end at tradition but extends to our innovations, dreams and discoveries. To be a contemporary African means to embody all things: history and future, urban and rural, work and leisure. Our man, once suffering under the layers of eurocentric paint emerges cleansed from the water moments before sunrise, finally free—ready for the new day. This is how to "get it back" we're told. To radically reinvent. To cleanse. To know one's self.

How do you interpret the stories from this video and how have they inspired you to find your Africanness or, "to get it back." Tell us what are you doing to champion your African culture on social media with the hashtag #GetItBack?

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The Five Must-Have Apps for Diaspora Africans in 2020

These mobile apps and digital platforms are making it easier for Africans across the world to find jobs and scholarships, get new citizenship and send money overseas.

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Mobile apps and digital platforms have fundamentally transformed nearly every aspect of our lives. Whether it's ordering food, keeping track of our work or life goals to sending money to our loved ones, these apps and digital platforms have made lives easier, efficient and more productive.

As the brand new year begins, we have compiled a list of five must-have apps and digital platforms that we believe will help Africans in the diaspora, especially in the U.S. make the most of the year.

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8 Tips on How to Save Money When Sending Money to Africa in 2020

WorldRemit shares some tips to help you save money when transferring money from the USA to Africa.

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Sending money abroad has never been easier. When planning to send money, most people do not realize that they can also save money while sending money back home to friends and family. Here are some tips to help you save money.

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Image courtesy of ARRAY.

What to Watch at Home During Coronavirus Shutdown: ARRAY's New Digital African Film Series

The film platform, from director Ava DuVernay, is hosting a weekly movie-viewing experience for the "global online community of cinephiles."

If you're looking for African films to dive into while at home during the coronavirus outbreak, a new digital series from award-winning director Ava DuVernay's film collective ARRAY is a great place to start. The multi-media platform and arts collective is launching its #ARRAYMatinee series, and each film will be available for viewing here.

#ARRAYMatinee is a virtual movie-viewing experience that will screen a string of the collective's previously released independent films from Africa and the diaspora. The weekly series begins on Wednesday, April 1 with a viewing of the 2015 South African coming-of-age film Ayanda. "Viewers will take a cinematic journey to the international destinations and cultures featured in five films that were released via the ARRAY Releasing independent film distribution collective that amplifies that work of emerging filmmakers of color and women of all kinds," says the platform in a press release. To promote a communal viewing experience, viewers are also encouraged to have discussions on Twitter, using the hashtag #ARRAYMatinee.

The five-part series will run weekly until May 13, and also includes films from Liberia, Ghana, and Grenada. See the full viewing schedule below with descriptions from ARRAY, and visit ARRAY's site at the allotted times to watch.

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Image by Sabelo Mkhabela.

'If you have no savings you are screwed': South African Artists Call For Coronavirus Relief

South African artists take to social media to criticize the government's lack of plans during the COVID-19 coronavirus crisis.

On Monday morning, a few ministers—including the minister of the Department of Sports, Arts and Culture Nathi Mthethwa—asked South Africans on Twitter to partake in a #LockdowngymChallenge.

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