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This Video Challenges You to "Get it Back"​

Throw off the constraints of western culture and embrace the richness of African tradition.

Sponsor content from Castle Milk Stout

Everyday we scour the continent for the latest in music and culture from African artists. And while style and innovation are in abundance, African creators are often overshadowed by their western counterparts. European language, culture and beauty still dominates African life both on the continent and abroad. Despite our rich traditions, African cultures are seen as second rate, something to be shed in favor of those of the west. With globalisation and international media intent on erasing what makes a place unique, it's up to us to stand up for what's ours.


In this powerful and poetic new video, a young man painted in western flags stands resolute but burdened looking down on his city until he falls, plunging into a deep pool of water representing a rebirth into African consciousness. Suddenly we see him as a young man, running through an unfinished building. Images of African pride set distinctly in a raw urban geography flash through his mind's eye. It tells the viewer that to be African and a city dweller is not a contradiction but something to be celebrated and cherished. This, too, is Africa.

Africanness it says, does not end at tradition but extends to our innovations, dreams and discoveries. To be a contemporary African means to embody all things: history and future, urban and rural, work and leisure. Our man, once suffering under the layers of eurocentric paint emerges cleansed from the water moments before sunrise, finally free—ready for the new day. This is how to "get it back" we're told. To radically reinvent. To cleanse. To know one's self.

How do you interpret the stories from this video and how have they inspired you to find your Africanness or, "to get it back." Tell us what are you doing to champion your African culture on social media with the hashtag #GetItBack?

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Image via TONL.

Uganda Has Lost Millions of Internet Users as a Result of Its Controversial Social Media Tax

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While the government claimed that the tax would assist in raising government revenue and help "maintain the security of the country and extend electricity so that you people can enjoy more of social media, more often, more frequently," said Uganda's Finance Minister Matia Kasaija at the time. President Museveni also suggested that the tax would help "curb gossip" online.

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Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

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Image courtesy of Doubleday.

Oyinkan Braithwaite's 'My Sister the Serial Killer' Is the Lagos-Set Novel Rocking the Crime Thriller Genre

We speak with the Nigerian author about the success of her debut novel, and breaking the boundaries of "African Lit."

"I have always been drawn to dark topics," says Oyinkan Braithwaite, the 30-year-old Nigerian author behind the critical darling of a novel My Sister, the Serial Killer.

Her declaration helps explain the subject and title of her debut novel, which tells the story of Ayoola, a young woman who has developed a not-so-healthy habit of murdering her boyfriends, leaving her older sister, the book's protagonist, Korede to clean up her mess. You may have noticed it's ubiquitous cover—which features a young black woman wearing a headwrap, casually looking on as a knife-wielding hands is reflected in her sunglasses—on your timeline or at your local store. The internationally-released, Nigerian-made novel sits confidently on retail shelves previously reserved for mass-market thrillers.

The dark and humorous, Lagos-set novel is extreme—but not just because of all the murdering that happens. It also examines the extreme nature of the many things that can push people to the edge. For the sisters, it's: intergenerational trauma, abuse, the prevalence of a culture that rewards beauty above all else, as well as having to battle with their own personal shortcomings—just to name a few.

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