News Brief

This South African Pantsula Dance Series is Taking TV by Storm

Tjovitjo is the most watched series on South African television ever.

New South African pantsula dance series Tjovitjo is the most watched series on South African television ever. According to statistics by the Broadcast Research Council of South Africa‚ the series, which first aired on the 20th of August on the national channel SABC1, attracted 5.7 million viewers in its first week.


This is more than any other drama series on the channel, which is the biggest in the country. Tjovitjo broke the record of such popular drama series like Yizo Yizo (3-million viewers), TSHISA (4.7-million) and Zone 14 (4.5-million), which were all aired on SABC1 a few years ago.

Tjovitjo has a star-studded cast including popular South African actors and actresses. The lead role is played by one of the most versatile SA actors, the award-winning Warren Masemola (put some respek on that name). Rapulana Seiphemo, Soso Rungqu, Harriet Manamela, Lali Dangazele, Sibulele Gcilitshana, Ntosh Madlingozi and Hlengiwe Lushaba are some of the popular names in the cast.

The series, which was originally meant to be a feature film, was directed by popular director Vincent Moloi. It's about a pantsula dance group called Amatjovitjo. It follows the crewmembers' individual lives.

Pantsula dance, which originates in the black townships of Johannesburg, dates back to the 1950s. It's one of the most popular dance styles in South Africa, and it survives to this day, though it has evolved from what it used to be.

The 26-part series airs every Wednesday on SABC1 at 8pm.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Watch Focalistic & Vigro Deep’s New Music Video For ‘Ke Star’

The 'Lockdown Level 1 anthem' has come to life through fire visuals.