News Brief
Image courtesy of Macmillan Children's Publishing Group.

Tomi Adeyemi Shares Release Date for Sequel to 'Children of Blood and Bone'

We won't have to wait much longer!

The sequel to Nigerian-American author Tomi Adeyemi's best-selling young adult novel, Children of Blood and Bone is on its way, and we can't wait.

Children of Blood and Bone, which has spent 44 weeks on the New York Time's Best Seller list, pulls on Yoruba cultural themes and follows the adventures of 17-year-old Zélie Adebola, a brave young girl on a mission to restore magic to the nation of Orisha.

READ: Tomi Adeyemi on Writing the Best and Blackest Fantasy Novel of the Year


The 25-year-old writer shared the news via Instagram, alerting fans that the highly-anticipated novel, Children Of Virtue And Vengeance will hit shelves on June 4 of this year.

She recently spoke with InStyle about the novel's success. "This was the story I dreamed of having as a girl and it's immensely personal, so it still blows my mind the way it's being embraced by the entire world," says Adeyemi.

When speaking about the upcoming sequel, she added:

I can't wait for people to meet the new characters, experience the new magic, and dive deeper into the enchanting world of Orïsha. I've had so much fun writing this story, so I can't wait to share it with everyone else!

Prior to the release of her debut novel, Adeyemi landed a six-figure movie deal from Fox Studios to turn her book into a feature-film. We spoke with the talented young writer last April about the Nigerian themes in her book, colorism, asserting the power of blackness in fantasy and more, revisit our conversation here.



News Brief
Photo by Eric Lafforgue/Art in All of Us/Corbis via Getty Images.

Kenyan Rastafarians Want Cannabis Unbanned for Religious Reasons

The Rastafari Society of Kenya argues that the personal use of cannabis, which is currently outlawed in the country, is an integral part of their religion.

According to local media reports, the Rastafari Society of Kenya has gone before the High Court to argue in favour of the personal use of cannabis. Currently illegal in Kenya, the minority religious group argues that the laws criminalising the use of cannabis in Kenya are prejudiced towards their religion given that the substance is a "sacrament connecting believers to their creator." Cannabis is commonly used as incense to initiate religious practises by Rastafarians and is often followed by a series of praises and prayers.

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