Travel

Travel Diary: Kofi Yankey Shares His Travel Highlights

Kofi Yankey shares snapshots of his recent travels.

DIASPORAJune is “No Borders” month at OkayAfrica. That can mean a lot of things and we’ll get to that, but one thing we wouldn’t want to miss out on is the sheer joy of travel. So, to honor the carefree black traveler we’ll be posting new photo diaries from a wide range of African and diaspora super-travelers of their favorite places and why.


Born in Accra, Ghana, Kofi Yankey now calls New York City—where he's lived and worked for the past 10 years— home. In his role as a fashion executive, he curates the voice and image of brands he works for. Whether it's a solo weekend trip to Paris, visiting the Hamptons in the dead of winter or spending the week in Tulum with friends, Kofi is always on the move.

Follow Yankey's Instagram for more incredible travel pics. Below, Yankey shows us some photos from his recent trips.

Soho Farmhouse in Oxfordshire

Photo courtesy of Kofi Yankey

 

“My annual trip to Palm Springs for Coachella”

Photo courtesy of Kofi Yankey

Doug Aitkins art installation in Palm Springs, "Mirage"

Photo courtesy of Kofi Yanke

At the Palais du Louvre, Paris

Photo courtesy of Kofi Yankey

Tulum, Mexico in April

Photo courtesy of Kofi Yankey

Photo courtesy of Kofi Yankey

Relaxing in the Hamptons

“People usually associate the Hamptons with summertime but even in the winter, you can't deny its charm and the relaxing effect it has on you.”

Photo courtesy of Kofi Yankey

Besides Ghana, the globetrotter has visited one other African country: South Africa.

“ I was in Cape Town several years ago for my cousins wedding and was blown away by how beautiful it is. I’m looking forward to visiting again!”
Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Ethic's Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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