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Trevor Noah's 'Great Xhosa Phrase' at the Oscars Was Very On Brand

You'd want to know what he really said—we're here for it.

Trevor Noah just gave us the comedic relief we didn't know we needed during the Oscars.

While presenting the montage for "Best Picture" nominee Black Panther, Noah touched on the "universal appeal" of the Marvel story while throwing shade at those who really believe Wakanda is a real place, greeting him with "Wakanda Forever."

"Growing up as a young boy in Wakanda, I would see T'Challa flying over our village, and he would remind me of a great Xhosa phrase," he says, "'Abelungu abazi' uba ndiyaxoka'—which means, 'In times like these, we are stronger when we fight together than when we try to fight apart."

Thing is—that's not what the phrase means.


Despite folks fawning that he spoke his mother tongue, he instead did a solid for the Xhosa speakers paying attention.

"The real translation is, 'White people don't know I'm lying,'" affirms Zimbabwean TV host Makho Ndlovu on Twitter, giving us the real tea.

Watch the clip below.


Trevor Noah trolls Oscars with Xhosa in-joke – SA reacts www.youtube.com

Interview

Interview: Bizzle Osikoya Is the A&R Shaping the Voice of a New Generation

We caught up with the A&R expert and co-founder of The Plug Management to talk about the fast-rising demand for Nigerian music and what it takes to break out as an artist.

The meteoric rise of Nigeria's burgeoning music industry over the last few years is definitely one for the books. From high profile collaborations that have graced international charts to appearances on American late night TV and a Grammy nomination, the Nigerian sound is sitting at the epicenter of a global conversation that the world—including Queen Bey herself —seem to scrabbling to get a piece of the action.

However, way before this global infiltration and westernized conflation of Africa's assortment of genres into one Afrobeats, Bizzle Osikoya was studying Music Business in England and plotting for a way to be a part of what he knew was inevitable. "I remember going to clubs in school and they would always play Jamaican music but rarely Nigerian songs. I knew we made good music here but I knew I couldn't sing. So I was motivated to come back, go behind the scenes, and see how we can make that crossover possible," he tells OkayAfrica.

More than a decade after making the intrepid decision to venture into A&R, helping artists find and develop their sound, Bizzle's creative genius has cascaded across different musical generations, from the piracy rife CD mix era with artists like Naeto C, Wande Coal and Dr. Sid to a streaming era populated with hits from Reekado Banks, Tiwa Savage and Davido.

Following the success of his latest project, Oxlade's Oxygene, we caught up with the A&R expert and co-founder of the Plug Management—a talent management company that has managed Davido, Peruzzi and DJ Obi—to talk about what it takes to break out as an artist, the fast-rising demand for Nigerian music, and how "alté" is not the same thing as alternative music.

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