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Trevor Noah Asks Ugandans: "Trump Or Dictator Museveni?"

Watch Trevor Noah weigh in on the Ugandan presidential election in a brilliant segment on 'The Daily Show.'

Trevor Noah weighed in on last week's Ugandan presidential election Monday night on The Daily Show.

As crazy as this election cycle has been in America, Noah insists it could be worse. “And it is worse, in Uganda," he says.

On Saturday, Uganda's incumbent president, Yoweri Museveni, was declared the winner of the country's troubled presidential election. He's already one of Africa's longest-serving presidents. With this win, he'll add five more years on top of the three decades he's served.

Related: Watch 2019 Miss Universe, Zozibini Tunzi, on 'The Daily Show with Trevor Noah'

“To break it down, this guy has been in power since 1986," Noah said. “In the Ugandan version of Back to the Future, whenever Doc Brown asks Marty who the president is, Marty says, 'It's the same guy'."

In January, Ugandans took to Twitter to note just how much has changed since 1986–everything, of course, with the exception of their president. We can't help but think The Daily Show writers must have caught wind of the #1986Pictures tweets–all the more likely when you consider one of Noah's staff writers is the Ugandan comic Joseph Opio, who rose to notoriety as the host of the political satire talk show LOLUganda.

A few months back, Noah called Trump the “perfect African president." But what would happen if Trump was up against an actual African dictator? The Daily Show enlisted their friends in Kampala to ask Ugandans on the street which of the two “power-hungry maniacs" would get their vote: “Trump or dictator Museveni"?

The results of course were mixed. Some picked Trump for pure entertainment value. Others said they don't think Ugandans would put up with Trump's hair. One man noted he has an uncle who's like Trump. “He's a man who is a loose cannon." And as one person put it, “That would be like asking a Muslim if they would have bacon or ham."

Watch the full segment below.

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Photo by Giles Clarke/UNOCHA via Getty Images

Cameroon Holds Vigil to Remember Children Killed in School Attack

Residents in Kumba paid their respects to the seven lives lost, and those injured during the attack over the weekend.

In the latest tragedy to come from Cameroon's historically violent clash between Anglo and Francophone citizens, seven children were murdered after attackers stormed a school with guns and machetes over the weekend.

In what has been deemed as the "darkest and saddest day," by Bishop Agapitus Nfon of Kumba, armed attackers stormed the Mother Francisca International Bilingual Academy, targeting students aged 9 to 12. The tragic event saw dozens of children injured, some critically.

The attack has shocked the nation, with both local and international agencies condemning the horrible offense. On Monday, Cameroonian President Paul Biya denounced the "horrific murder" of the school children, and alluded to the "appropriate measures" being taken in order to bring justice to the families of the victims. Prime Minister Dion Ngute Joseph shared his condolences via a tweet saying, "I bow before the memory of these innocent kids."

The Cameroonian presidency and governing body have blamed Anglophone 'separatists' for the attack, though the group claims no part in the attack.

Human rights groups, however, have blamed both opposing parties, as the conflict has led to the death of over 3,000 deaths and resulted in more than 700,000 Cameroonians fleeing their homes and the country.

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Interview: Meet Velemseni, Eswatini’s Queen of Soul

Soul artist Velemseni's music reflects Eswatini culture and aesthetics. "The Kingdom of Eswatini is a magical and mysterious place, and my music aims to interpret and document that mystique, drawing from genres like Swazi gospel, soul, African soul, cinematic and traditional music," says the artist.