News Brief

People Are Struggling To Decipher Trump's Incoherent Answer to Why He Removed Sudan From The Travel Ban

Trump left folks confused as he laughably stumbled through responses about his travel ban on Wednesday.

On Sunday, Donald "Not My President" Trump, reworked his infamous "Muslim Ban," to include Chad, North Korea and Venezuela, while removing Sudan from the list.

Why did he make these arbitrary changes to an already gratuitous policy? Well, he doesn't know either.

When asked by a reporter on Wednesday, why he lifted the travel ban on Sudan, Trump struggled to provide an even slightly coherent answer.

"First of all, can you explain to us why Sudan was removed?” asked a reporter. “And second of all, how does the travel ban work in North Korea that doesn’t allow their people out of their country?”

Here's what he had to say:

“Well, the people—yeah, the people allowed—certain countries—but we can add countries very easily and we can take countries away."

Wait, there's more:

“And as far as the travel ban is concerned,” he continued. “Whatever it is, I want the toughest travel ban you can have. So I’ll see you in Indiana. We’re going to go over some more points that have not been talked about.”

It's okay, Trump, your plan doesn't make sense to us either.

Though Trump appears to be clueless, many believe that the changes to the policy were made in an attempt to make the order seem as though it isn't fully target towards Muslims—while still ensuring that it targets Muslims, reports Think Progress.

Many Chadians have expressed confusion as to why their country was added. Did the man spin a globe, close his eyes, and just roll with whichever country his finger landed on? It's very possible, however in its original statement, the administration claimed that Chad was added after the government failed to "share the required anti-terrorism and public information with the U.S."

There's also been speculation that the ban might have something to do with Chad's attempt to fine Exxon Mobile $74 billion for skipping royalty payments. A fine which the oil giant was eventually able to avoid after the two parties reached a settlement.

We know not to ask Trump about the reasoning behind the decision. While his administration is yet to provide any real information, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, the U.S. National Security Advisor,  says the "list is not fixed. On Chad, there was a real debate.”

Nonetheless, people are still trying to figure out what exactly Trump was trying to articulate during his press conference. Everyone seems to be having a really difficult time. Read some of the hilarious responses to Trump's "statements" below.

Interview

A Candid Conversation With Olamide & Fireboy DML

We talk to the Nigerian stars about the hardest lessons they've learned, best advice they've ever been given and what Nigeria means to them.

Olamide and Fireboy DML have been working together for three years, but the first time they sit down to do an interview together is hours after they arrive in New York City on a promo tour.

It's Fireboy's first time in the Big Apple — and in the US — and the rain that's pouring outside his hotel doesn't hinder his gratitude. "It's such a relief to be here, it's long overdue," he tells OkayAfrica. "I was supposed to be here last year, but Covid stopped that. This is a time to reflect and refresh. It's a reset button for me."

Olamide looks on, smiling assuredly. Since signing Fireboy to his YBNL Nation label in 2018, he's watched the soulful young singer rise to become one of Nigeria's most talked-about artists — from his breakout single, "Jealous," to his debut album Laughter, Tears & Goosebumps, hit collabs with D.Smoke and Cuppy, and his sophomore release, Apollo, last year.

Even while he shares his own latest record, UY Scuti, with the world, Olamide nurtures Fireboy's career with as much care and attention as he does his own, oscillating between his two roles of artist and label exec seamlessly. His 2020 album Carpe Diem is the most streamed album ever by an African rap artist, according to Audiomack, hitting over 140 million streams. When Olamide signed a joint venture with US-based record label and distribution company, Empire, in February last year he did so through his label, bringing Fireboy and any other artist he decides to sign along for the ride, and establishing one of the most noteworthy deals on the continent.

Below, Olamide & Fireboy DML speak to OkayAfrica about their mutual admiration for each other, what makes them get up in the morning and how they switch off.

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